Monday, February 28, 2011

Sittin' on top of the world

Corey Harris and Taj Mahal

Our deepest fear



"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others."


~Marianne Williamson

Sunday, February 27, 2011

UVA beats Stony Brook in Men's Lacrosse in OT

Feb 26, 2011

Stanwick Caps Huge Day with OT Winner

by Sam Kilb | Special to Lacrosse Magazine Online 

Junior attackman Steele Stanwick celebrates after his overtime goal Saturday helped Virginia, minus the Bratton brothers, get by Stony Brook, 11-10.

© Greg Shemitz
STONY BROOK, N.Y. – The scenario was eerily familiar. The Virginia men's lacrosse team led Stony Brook, 10-9, with less than a minute to go in a game at Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium on Stony Brook’s campus.
The last time Stony Brook and Virginia played, it was in the NCAA quarterfinals in front of a packed house at the same venue, and the same scoreline stood with a minute remaining.  In that one, Stony Brook’s last-ditch efforts came up short and Virginia advanced to the final four.
This time, it would require a little more work from the Cavaliers, but Steele Stanwick made sure the end result remained the same. Stanwick capped off a five-goal, two-assist performance with the game-winning goal with 44 seconds remaining in overtime to lift top-ranked Virginia to an 11-10 victory over fifth-ranked Stony Brook.
"I give our kids a lot of credit," said Virginia head coach Dom Starsia. "We saddled them defensively the entire game, but you can't stop them from making all the plays. It was a great lacrosse game – another great matchup, another great atmosphere here in Stony Brook."
Stony Brook tied the game with three seconds remaining in regulation. Out of a Seawolves timeout, the ball made its way to the stick of Russ Bonanno. He waited behind the net for a few tantalizing seconds as his teammates cleared out, then charged towards the left and fired past Virginia goalkeeper Adam Ghitelman to tie the game at 10 and send it to overtime.
The Seawolves got possession off the opening faceoff in overtime, but could not convert on two shots. The Cavaliers could not score either, but Stony Brook’s clearing attempt went horribly awry, ending up in the stick of Steele Stanwick, who with 44 seconds to go in overtime grabbed the loose ball in front of the Stony Brook net and fired it home to give Virginia the win and send Seawolves players to their knees in exhausted disappointment.
“It was a matter of being in the right place at the right time,” Stanwick said of the goal, his fifth of the game and eighth of the season. “Sometimes you need a little luck.”
The Cavaliers improved to 3-0. It was the first game of the year for Stony Brook, who have never beaten the Cavaliers and lost to Virginia for the ninth time in school history.
“I wouldn’t say frustrating, it’s more disappointing,” said Seawolves senior midfielder Kevin Crowley, Lacrosse Magazine's Division I preseason player of the year. “But we have a lot of lacrosse left.”
Both teams were without star players, as Stony Brook’s Tom Compitello sat out with an illness and Rhamel and Shamel Bratton of Virginia were suspended for what Cavaliers head coach Dom Starsia classified as “violations of team policy.”
They may have missed the Bratton brothers early, as the teams managed just one goal apiece in the first quarter. Stanwick scored early on a defensive mistake, but the Seawolves settled down after a Crowley goal leveled the score.
Ghitelman and senior Rob Camposa, making his first start for Stony Brook, each made two saves in the first quarter. Ghitelman earned his 40th career win, tying him atop the Cavaliers all-time wins list. He finished with 10 saves to Camposa’s 11.
After going down 3-1 with less than five minutes to go in the first half, Virginia climbed back to even terms courtesy of Stanwick and freshman attack Mark Cockerton, who scored goals a minute apart to tie the game at three going into halftime.
Virginia controlled the game through the third and stretched its lead to three goals midway through the fourth quarter.
Senior Adam Rand took over the faceoff circle late in the game when Stony Brook needed it most, however. Rand won nine of 12 fourth quarter faceoffs and the only faceoff of overtime.
The floodgates opened late in the fourth quarter, with the teams combining for nine goals in the final seven minutes of regulation. The Seawolves trailed by two when Colin Briggs scored with 1:12 remaining to put the Cavaliers up 10-8, but Crowley scored with 21 seconds to go, and Bonanno’s goal with three seconds left sent the game to overtime. Crowley finished with four goals and an assist.
But the Seawolves could not earn revenge for last season’s NCAA tournament ousting.
“Unlike last season, this is just the beginning, not the end,” Seawolves head coach Rick Sowell said. “We feel confident that we’ll continue to get better.”
For Virginia, it was a win that serves as a confidence boost for a team already riding high. “For us to come on the road to Stony Brook and win is important for this team as we move forward,” Starsia said.
The Seawolves will play at Marist on March 5, while the Cavaliers will host VMI on Feb. 28. 

Consider the lilies




Jesus said, "No one can serve two masters; for a slave will either hate the one and love the other, or be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth.

"Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or what you will drink, or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds of the air; they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they? And can any of you by worrying add a single hour to your span of life? And why do you worry about clothing? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they neither toil nor spin, yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not clothed like one of these. But if God so clothes the grass of the field, which is alive today and tomorrow is thrown into the oven, will he not much more clothe you-- you of little faith? Therefore do not worry, saying, `What will we eat?' or `What will we drink?' or `What will we wear?' For it is the Gentiles who strive for all these things; and indeed your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things. But strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.

"So do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will bring worries of its own. Today's trouble is enough for today."

~Matthew 6:24-34

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

I lift up my eyes to the hills





From where does our help come?  To whom do we turn?  In times of walking the desert pathways, where do we look?  The psalmist reminds us from where our help comes.  It comes from the LORD, the maker of heaven and earth.  This is the direction of our prayer, of our hopes and dreams, as we walk the ways of challenge and turmoil, for he shall neither slumber nor sleep and will watch over us.


~The Rev. Peter M. Carey




Psalm 121



I lift up my eyes to the hills; *
from where is my help to come?
My help comes from the LORD, *
the maker of heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved *
and he who watches over you will not fall asleep.
Behold, he who keeps watch over Israel *
shall neither slumber nor sleep;
The LORD himself watches over you; *
the LORD is your shade at your right hand,
So that the sun shall not strike you by day, *
nor the moon by night.
The LORD shall preserve you from all evil; *
it is he who shall keep you safe.
The LORD shall watch over your going out and your coming in, *
from this time forth for evermore.

Monday, February 21, 2011

To be nobody but myself







To be nobody but myself–in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else–means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight, and never stop fighting. 


~ e.e. cummings

For truth



"I'm for truth, no matter who tells it. I'm for justice, no matter who it is for or against. I'm a human being, first and foremost, and as such I'm for whoever and whatever benefits humanity as a whole." 


~ Malcolm X, RIP Feb 21, 1965

Sunday, February 20, 2011

7 Epiphany Sermon - "Be perfect" - 20 February 2011


The Rev. Peter M. Carey
7 Epiphany 2011 Sermon
20 February 2011
Emmanuel Episcopal Church in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia

Jesus sets the bar high, but he enacts what he demands.  When Jesus speaks during the Sermon on the Mount he lays out high expectations for his hearers, high enough expectations that some must have heard him and mumbled and grumbled and stumbled off to go about their day.  When he expands upon and deepens the understanding of the requirements of the law and the tradition, he is making the kind of demands that are both hard to hear and also strike the ear with hope and joy.

When Jesus appears to give this sermon on the Mount confirmed that he was no mere teacher of daily wisdom, no mere healer of everyday occurrence, no mere friend doing good works for those in need, no mere companion of the poor and outcast.  Don’t hear this the wrong way.  Jesus was the teacher, the healer, the friend, the companion but he was far more, of course. 

It is tempting to try to water down the words of Jesus that we have read over the last few weeks.  It is tempting to try to explain them away, to give historical reasons why his understanding of “enemy” may not be ours.  It is tempting to try to explain away his notion that when a mile is demanded we should give our oppressor two miles of service.  It is tempting to listen somewhat attentively to the words of the gospel and the words of the preacher only to forget these words over a cup of coffee and the commencing of the 2nd half of our weekend. 

However, what if we really took this words to heart.  What if we placed these words in our minds and let them roll around for awhile.  What if we wrote these words down on a slip of paper and put them into our wallets.  What if we wrote these words down on a bookmark and used it for the reading of our nighttime reading this week.  What if we pasted them with scotch tape on our car steering wheel and read them when we’re stuck in traffic or in the pickup line or when we’re waiting to pick up a loved one.  What if we really took these words to heart?  What if we thought, perhaps, that Jesus actually meant what he said?

Jesus sets the bar high, but he enacts what he demands.   A few weeks ago, we heard Jesus give blessings to his close followers before he began the Sermon on the Mount, and we came to understand that he was not merely describing the blessings of the poor in spirit, those who mourn, and those who are persecuted for righteousness sake.  No.  Jesus offered the blessings and enacted blessing – he made the community a blessed community – he was not merely describing, but creating.  He was not describing the reality, but transforming the community into the blessed community – never the same, but richer, deeper, more joyful, more hopeful, more glad, more giving, more loving, more faithful.  Who was saying these words was vital for our understanding.

Last week, we heard that Jesus was once again creating transformation when he led his hearers into a deeper and richer understanding of their own tradition.  But, again, he was not merely teaching, but creating.  He was not merely describing, but transforming.  When he asked his hearers to understand in a new way, he was actually making them understand, when he was calling them to a new life, he was empowering them to live a new life, when he was setting the bar high, he was also lifting them over that bar.  Jesus sets a high bar, but enacts what he demands.

And so, we are still left with these words – love your enemy, pray for those who persecute you, …

“You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you, Do not resist an evildoer.  But if anyone strikes you on the right cheek, turn the other also; and if anyone wants to sue you and take your coat, give your cloak as well; and if anyone forces you to go one mile, go also the second mile.  Give to anyone who wants to borrow from you.

You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’  But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.  For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have?  Do not even the tax collectors do the same?  And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others?  Do not even the Gentiles do the same?  Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

You see, Jesus is the prophet who is not only predicting and describing the new reality, he is the prophet who is not only painting the picture of living that will occur.  He is painting a picture, but he is placing us within it.

The painting of Jesus has at its core the beloved and blessed community, the community open to all – the wedding banquet which is ever expanding and where there is a place for all.  At the core of this blessed community are demands and requirements that seem impossible.  For us, to imagine how to live these out are seemingly impossible.  But they are what God demands.  They are what Jesus demands.  However, Jesus enacts what he demands.

All things are possible with God.

The Kingdom of God is not enacted by us, is not brought into being through our own efforts, is not limited by our imagination, but is limited only by the ever expanding and growing imagination and creation of God.

When Jesus says “Be perfect,” he is not admonishing us.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is not challenging us.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is not trying to scare us.  When Jesus says “Be perfect,” he is transforming us, creating us, and placing us in the grand tapestry that God is weaving.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is making us perfect, as our heavenly Father is perfect.

Friday, February 18, 2011

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Getting ready for lacrosse season!

70 degree weather here in central Virginia has me thinking all about Spring, though we are still in mid-February.  In my homestate of Vermont, Feb 17 is surely "the bleak midwinter" but today was amazing weather.  Lacrosse season begins here for high schools this week and the University of Virginia men's and women's teams kick off their seasons this weekend.  As an unabashed fan of lacrosse, after playing and coaching for decades, I am pumped.  I'm still thinking through how one observes a Holy Lent while also relishing the feasts of fun and joy that are lacrosse ... no answers there just yet.

Go Lacrosse!  (Go UVA!)

~The Rev. Peter M. Carey



Monday, February 14, 2011

Being with the mystery



Christian, Jew, Muslim, shaman, Zoroastrian, stone, ground, mountain, river, each has a secret way of being with the mystery, unique and not to be judged.


~Rumi

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Absolom Jones - America's first black priest



Absolom Jones
from "Episcopal Archives" online


Absalom Jones was America’s first black priest. Born into slavery in Delaware at a time when slavery was being debated as immoral and undemocratic, he taught himself to read, using the New Testament as one of his resources. At the age of 16, Jones was sold to a shopkeeper in Philadelphia where he attended a night school for blacks, operated by Quakers. Following the purchase of his own freedom in 1784, Jones served as lay minister for the black membership at St. George’s Methodist Episcopal Church.

The active evangelism of Jones and that of his friend, Richard Allen, greatly increased black membership at St. George’s. Alarmed by the rise in black attendance, the vestry decided to segregate blacks into an upstairs gallery without notice. When ushers attempted to remove the black congregants, the resentful group exited the church. This exodus triggered the establishment of the Free African Society by Jones and Allen in 1787 to aid in the emancipation of slaves and to offer sustenance and spiritual support to widows, orphans, and the poor.

1794 Jones and Allen, with the assistance of local Quakers and Episcopalians, established the “First African Church” in Philadelphia. Shortly after the establishment that same year, the African Church applied to join the Protestant Episcopal Church, laying before the diocese three requirements: the Church must be received as an already organized body; it must have control over it’s own affairs; and Jones must be licensed as lay-reader and if qualified, ordained as its minister.




Upon acceptance into the Diocese of Pennsylvania, the church was renamed the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas. The following year Jones became a deacon but was not ordained a priest until 1804, nine years later. At 58 years old, he became the first black American priest. He continued to be a leader in his community, founding a day school (as blacks were excluded from attending public school), the Female Benevolent Society, and an African Friendly Society. In 1800 he called upon Congress to abolish the slave trade and to provide for gradual emancipation of existing slaves. Jones died in 1818.

Thursday, February 10, 2011

10 February 2011 Sermon - The Rev. Peter M. Carey

The Rev. Peter M. Carey
7 Epiphany 2011 Sermon
20 February 2011
Emmanuel Episcopal Church in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia

Jesus sets the bar high, but he enacts what he demands.  When Jesus speaks during the Sermon on the Mount he lays out high expectations for his hearers, high enough expectations that some must have heard him and mumbled and grumbled and stumbled off to go about their day.  When he expands upon and deepens the understanding of the requirements of the law and the tradition, he is making the kind of demands that are both hard to hear and also strike the ear with hope and joy.

When Jesus appears to give this sermon on the Mount confirmed that he was no mere teacher of daily wisdom, no mere healer of everyday occurrence, no mere friend doing good works for those in need, no mere companion of the poor and outcast.  Don’t hear this the wrong way.  Jesus was the teacher, the healer, the friend, the companion but he was far more, of course. 

It is tempting to try to water down the words of Jesus that we have read over the last few weeks.  It is tempting to try to explain them away, to give historical reasons why his understanding of “enemy” may not be ours.  It is tempting to try to explain away his notion that when a mile is demanded we should give our oppressor two miles of service.  It is tempting to listen somewhat attentively to the words of the gospel and the words of the preacher only to forget these words over a cup of coffee and the commencing of the 2nd half of our weekend. 

However, what if we really took this words to heart.  What if we placed these words in our minds and let them roll around for awhile.  What if we wrote these words down on a slip of paper and put them into our wallets.  What if we wrote these words down on a bookmark and used it for the reading of our nighttime reading this week.  What if we pasted them with scotch tape on our car steering wheel and read them when we’re stuck in traffic or in the pickup line or when we’re waiting to pick up a loved one.  What if we really took these words to heart?  What if we thought, perhaps, that Jesus actually meant what he said?

Jesus sets the bar high, but he enacts what he demands.   A few weeks ago, we heard Jesus give blessings to his close followers before he began the Sermon on the Mount, and we came to understand that he was not merely describing the blessings of the poor in spirit, those who mourn, and those who are persecuted for righteousness sake.  No.  Jesus offered the blessings and enacted blessing – he made the community a blessed community – he was not merely describing, but creating.  He was not describing the reality, but transforming the community into the blessed community – never the same, but richer, deeper, more joyful, more hopeful, more glad, more giving, more loving, more faithful.  Who was saying these words was vital for our understanding.

Last week, we heard that Jesus was once again creating transformation when he led his hearers into a deeper and richer understanding of their own tradition.  But, again, he was not merely teaching, but creating.  He was not merely describing, but transforming.  When he asked his hearers to understand in a new way, he was actually making them understand, when he was calling them to a new life, he was empowering them to live a new life, when he was setting the bar high, he was also lifting them over that bar.  Jesus sets a high bar, but enacts what he demands.

And so, we are still left with these words – love your enemy, pray for those who persecute you, …

“You have heard that it was said, ‘An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.’ But I say to you, Do not resist an evildoer.  But if anyone strikes you on the right cheek, turn the other also; and if anyone wants to sue you and take your coat, give your cloak as well; and if anyone forces you to go one mile, go also the second mile.  Give to anyone who wants to borrow from you.

You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’  But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous.  For if you love those who love you, what reward do you have?  Do not even the tax collectors do the same?  And if you greet only your brothers and sisters, what more are you doing than others?  Do not even the Gentiles do the same?  Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.”

You see, Jesus is the prophet who is not only predicting and describing the new reality, he is the prophet who is not only painting the picture of living that will occur.  He is painting a picture, but he is placing us within it.

The painting of Jesus has at its core the beloved and blessed community, the community open to all – the wedding banquet which is ever expanding and where there is a place for all.  At the core of this blessed community are demands and requirements that seem impossible.  For us, to imagine how to live these out are seemingly impossible.  But they are what God demands.  They are what Jesus demands.  However, Jesus enacts what he demands.

All things are possible with God.

The Kingdom of god is not enacted by us, is not brought into being through our own efforts, is not limited by our imagination, but is limited only by the ever expanding and growing imagination and creation of God.


When Jesus says “Be perfect,” he is not admonishing us.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is not challenging us.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is not trying to scare us.  When Jesus says “Be perfect,” he is transforming us, creating us, and placing us in the grand tapestry that God is weaving.  When Jesus says, “Be perfect” he is making us perfect, as our heavenly Father is perfect.

To be free



‎"To be free is not merely to cast off one's chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others." 


~Nelson Mandela, who was released from prison on 10 Feb 1990

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood, VA - connect with us online!

You can find Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood, VA HERE or at www.emmanuelgreenwood.org and you can "subscribe" to our website on the lower right-hand corner of the site in order to get updates each time we post a news item.  

You can also "fan" us HERE on Facebook.  Become a fan of Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Greenwood, VA an Episcopal Church in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia!

Come and visit us online, and then pay us a visit in Greenwood, VA, just 15 miles West of Charlottesville and 5 miles East of the Blue Ridge Parkway on RT 250.

~The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Associate Rector

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Be joyful though you have considered all the facts.



Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front


Love the quick profit, the annual raise,
vacation with pay. Want more
of everything ready-made. Be afraid
to know your neighbors and to die.
And you will have a window in your head.
Not even your future will be a mystery
any more. Your mind will be punched in a card
and shut away in a little drawer.
When they want you to buy something
they will call you. When they want you
to die for profit they will let you know.

So, friends, every day do something
that won't compute. Love the Lord.
Love the world. Work for nothing.
Take all that you have and be poor.
Love someone who does not deserve it.
Denounce the government and embrace
the flag. Hope to live in that free
republic for which it stands.
Give your approval to all you cannot
understand. Praise ignorance, for what man
has not encountered he has not destroyed.

Ask the questions that have no answers.
Invest in the millenium. Plant sequoias.
Say that your main crop is the forest
that you did not plant,
that you will not live to harvest.
Say that the leaves are harvested
when they have rotted into the mold.
Call that profit. Prophesy such returns.

Put your faith in the two inches of humus
that will build under the trees
every thousand years.
Listen to carrion - put your ear
close, and hear the faint chattering
of the songs that are to come.
Expect the end of the world. Laugh.
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful
though you have considered all the facts.
So long as women do not go cheap
for power, please women more than men.
Ask yourself: Will this satisfy
a woman satisfied to bear a child?
Will this disturb the sleep
of a woman near to giving birth?

Go with your love to the fields.
Lie down in the shade. Rest your head
in her lap. Swear allegiance
to what is nighest your thoughts.
As soon as the generals and the politicos
can predict the motions of your mind,
lose it. Leave it as a sign
to mark the false trail, the way
you didn't go. Be like the fox
who makes more tracks than necessary,
some in the wrong direction.
Practice resurrection.
"Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front" from The Country of Marriage, by Wendell Berry

Friday, February 04, 2011

4 February - Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Happy Birthday to one of the important modern saints, Dietrich Bonhoeffer.




“The church is the hidden Christ among us.”[1] 
~Dietrich Bonhoeffer


God is concerned not only with the nations, but has a purpose for every community no matter how small, every friendship, every marriage, every family.  And in this sense God also has a purpose for the church.  There is not only the culpability of individual Germans and individual Christians, but also the culpability of Germany and of the church.  It is not enough for individuals to repent and be justified; Germany and the church must likewise repent and be justified.[2]


We are certainly not Christ; we are not called on to redeem the world by our own deeds and sufferings, and we need not try to assume such an impossible burden.  We are not lords, but instruments in the hand of the Lord of history; and we can share in other people’s sufferings only to a very limited degree.  We are not Christ, but if we want to be Christians, we must have some share in Christ’s large-heartedness by acting with responsibility and in freedom when the hour of danger comes, and by showing a real sympathy that springs, not from fear, but from the liberating and redeeming love of Christ for all who suffer.  Mere waiting and looking on is not Christian behaviour.  The Christian is called to sympathy and action, not in the first place by his own sufferings, but by the sufferings of his brethren, for whose sake Christ suffered.[3]

[1] Bonhoeffer, Dietrich No Rusty Swords : Letters, Lectures and Notes – 1928-1936- From the Collected Works, Volume I (Collins, London: 1965), 68.



[2] Bonhoeffer, Dietrich Sanctorum Communio: A Theological Study of the Sociology of the Church (Minneapolis, Fortress: 1998), 119.


[3] Bonhoeffer, Dietrich Letters and Papers from Prison, New Greatly Enlarged Edition (New York, Touchstone: 1997), 14.


Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Yoda quotes


From "wookiepedia"


Yoda's quotes from the moviesEdit Yoda's quotes from the movies sectionEdit

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom MenaceEdit Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace sectionEdit


"Fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to suffering."
―Yoda — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

"Confer on you, the level of Jedi Knight, the Council does. But, agree with your taking this boy as your Padawan Learner… I do not."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

"Qui-Gon's defiance I sense in you. Need that you do not. Agree with you, the Council does. Your apprentice young Skywalker will be."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the ClonesEdit Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones sectionEdit


"Lost a planet, Master Obi-Wan has. How embarrassing... how embarrassing."
―Yoda[src]

"Go to the center of the gravity's pull, and find your planet you will."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan[src]

"Meditate on this, I will."
―Yoda[src]

"Clear, your mind must be if you are to discover the real villains behind the plot."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan[src]

"Pain. Suffering. Death, I feel. Something terrible has happened. Young Skywalker is in pain. Terrible pain."
―Yoda[src]

"Around the survivors, a perimeter create!"
―Yoda[src]

"Powerful you have become, Dooku. The dark side I sense in you."
―Yoda to Dooku[src]

"Master Obi-Wan, not victory. The shroud of the dark side has fallen. Begun, the Clone War has!"
―Yoda[src]

"Much to learn, you still have."
―Yoda to Dooku[src]

Star Wars: Clone WarsEdit Star Wars: Clone Wars sectionEdit


"Like fire across the galaxy, the Clone Wars spread. In league with the wicked Count Dooku more and more planets slip. Upon the Jedi Knights falls the duty to lead the newly formed Army of the Republic."
―Yoda[src]

Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the SithEdit Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith sectionEdit


"Death is a natural part of life. Rejoice for those who transform into the Force. Mourn them do not. Miss them do not. Attachment leads to jealousy. The shadow of greed, that is."
Yoda[src]

"Careful you must be when sensing the future, Anakin. The fear of loss is a path to the dark side."
―Yoda to Anakin Skywalker[src]

"Train yourself to let go of everything you fear to lose."
―Yoda to Anakin Skywalker[src]

"Go, I will. Good relations with the Wookiees, I have."
―Yoda[src]

"Too much under the sway of the Chancellor, he is. Much anger there is in him. Too much pride in his powers."
―Yoda[src]

"If a special session of Congress there is, easier for us to enter the Jedi Temple it will be."
―Yoda[src]

"If into the security recordings you go, only pain will you find."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

"Destroy the Sith, we must."
―Yoda[src]

"To fight this Lord Sidious, strong enough, you are not."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

"Twisted by the dark side, young Skywalker has become."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

"The boy you trained, gone he is, consumed by Darth Vader."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

"I hear a new apprentice you have, Emperor. Or should I call you Darth Sidious?"
―Yoda to Palpatine[src]

"At an end your rule is... and not short enough it was."
―Yoda to Palpatine[src]

"Not if anything to say about it, I have!"
―Yoda[src]

"Into exile I must go. Failed, I have."
―Yoda to Bail Organa[src]

"If so powerful you are, why leave?"
―Yoda[src]

"Faith in your new apprentice, misplaced may be. As is your faith in the dark side of the Force."
―Yoda[src]

Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes BackEdit Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back sectionEdit


Luke: "I feel like..."
Yoda: "Feel like what?"
Luke Skywalker and Yoda[src]

"Looking? Found someone you have I would say, mm?"
―Yoda[src]

"Help you I can! Yes! Mm!"
―Yoda to Luke — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

"Awww, cannot get your ship out...eh-heheheh!"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"How you get so big, eating food of this kind?"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Mine! Or I will help you not!"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Mudhole? Slimy? My home this is!"
―Yoda to Luke — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

"Mine! Mine! Mine! MINE!!!"
―Yoda to R2-D2[src]

"No, no no, stay and help you I will! Hehe! Find your friend, mm?"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Ohhh...Jedi Master! Yoda. You seek Yoda!"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"No! Try not. Do, or do not. There is no try."
―Yoda to Luke — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

Luke: "I'm looking for a great warrior."
Yoda: "Wars not make one great."
―Luke Skywalker and Yoda[src]

"Ready are you? What know you of ready? For eight hundred years have I trained Jedi. My own counsel will I keep on who is to be trained! A Jedi must have the deepest commitment, the most serious mind. This one a long time have I watched. All his life has he looked away... to the future, to the horizon. Never his mind on where he was. Hmm? What he was doing. Hmph. Adventure. Heh. Excitement. Heh. A Jedi craves not these things. You are reckless!"
―Yoda — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

Yoda: "I cannot teach him. The boy has no patience."
Obi-Wan: "He will learn patience."
Yoda: "Hmm. Much anger in him, like his father."
Obi-Wan: "Was I any different, when you taught me?"
―Yoda and Obi-Wan Kenobi[src]

Luke: "I won't fail you. I'm not afraid."
Yoda: "You will be. You will be."
―Luke Skywalker and Yoda[src]

"Yes. A Jedi's strength flows from the Force. But beware the dark side. Anger, fear, aggression. The dark side of the Force are they. Easily they flow, quick to join you in a fight. If once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny. Consume you it will, as it did Obi-Wan's apprentice."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

Luke: "Vader... Is the dark side stronger?"
Yoda: "No, no, no. Quicker, easier, more seductive."
Luke: "But how am I to know the good side from the bad?"
Yoda: "You will know... when you are calm, at peace, passive. A Jedi uses the Force for knowledge and defense, never for attack."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"So certain are you. Always with you it cannot be done. Hear you nothing that I say?"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"No! No different! Only different in your mind. You must unlearn what you have learned."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

Luke: "I don't believe it..."
Yoda: "That is why you fail."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"No! Try not. Do. Or do not. There is no try."
―Yoda to Luke — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

"Size matters not. Look at me. Judge me by my size do you?"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"And well you should not! For my ally is the Force. And a powerful ally it is. Life creates it, makes it grow. Its energy surrounds us... and binds us. Luminous beings are we, not this... [nudging Luke's arm] crude matter! You must feel the Force around you. Here, between you, me, the tree, the rock... everywhere! Even between the land and the ship."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Through the Force, things you will see. Other places. The future...the past...old friends long gone."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Hmm. Control, control. You must learn control."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Decide you must how to serve them best. If you leave now, help them you could. But you would destroy all for which they have fought and suffered."
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"Strong is Vader. Mind what you have learned. Save you it can!"
―Yoda to Luke[src]

"No. There is another."
―Yoda to Obi-Wan[src]

Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the JediEdit Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi sectionEdit


"When nine hundred years old you reach, look as good, you will not, hm?"
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker — (audio)Listen (file info)[src]

"Strong am I with the Force, but not that strong. Twilight is upon me, and soon night must fall. That is the way of things... the way of the Force."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"No more training do you require. Already know you that which you need."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"No. Unfortunate that you rushed to face him... that incomplete was your training. Not ready for the burden were you."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"Remember, a Jedi's strength flows from the Force. But beware. Anger, fear, aggression. The dark side are they. Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"Your father he is."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"Luke...Luke...Do not...Do not underestimate the powers of the Emperor, or suffer your father's fate, you will."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"Luke, when gone am I, the last of the Jedi will you be."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

"Luke, there is another... Sky...walker."
―Yoda to Luke Skywalker[src]

Expanded UniverseEdit Expanded Universe sectionEdit

Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (novel)Edit Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (novel) sectionEdit


"Pity your new disciple I do; so lately an apprentice, so soon without a Master."
―Yoda[src]

Star Wars: Battlefront IIEdit Star Wars: Battlefront II sectionEdit


"War does not make one great."
―Yoda[src]

"Proud I am, to stand by Wookiees in their hour of need."
―Yoda[src]

"Yoda I am, fight I will."
―Yoda[src]

"Tired I am, rest I must."
―Yoda[src]

ShatterpointEdit Shatterpoint sectionEdit


"When all choices seem wrong, choose restraint."
―recalled by Mace Windu[src]

"If no mistake have you made, yet losing you are ... a different game you should play."
―recalled by Mace Windu[src]

Yoda: Dark RendezvousEdit Yoda: Dark Rendezvous sectionEdit


"A trial of being old is this: remembering which thing one has said into which young ears."
―Yoda[src]

Yoda: "Think you I have never felt the touch of the dark? Know you what a soul so great as Yoda can make, in eight hundred years?"
Dooku: "Master?"
Yoda: "Many mistakes!"
―Yoda and Dooku[src]

"Think you the relationship between Master and Padawan is only to help them? Oh, this is what we let them believe, yes! But when the day comes that even old Yoda does not learn something from his students-then truly, he shall be a teacher no more."
―Yoda[src]

"On many long journeys have I gone. And waited, too, for others to return from journeys of their own. Some return; some are broken; some come back so different only their names remain."
―Yoda[src]

"When you fall, apprentice, catch you I will."
―Yoda to Dooku[src]

"Secret, shall I tell you? Grand Master of Jedi Order am I. Won this job in a raffle I did, think you? "How did you know, how did you know, Master Yoda?" Master Yoda knows these things. His job it is."
―Master Yoda to Scout[src]

"Honor life by living, Padawan. Killing honors only death: only the dark side."
―Yoda[src]

"To be Jedi is to face the truth, and choose. Give off light, or darkness, Padawan. Be a candle, or the night, Padawan: but choose!"
―Yoda to Whie Malreaux[src]

"When you look at the dark side, careful you must be ... for the dark side looks back."
―Yoda[src]

"You think Yoda stops teaching, just because his student does not want to hear? Yoda a teacher is. Yoda teaches like drunkards drink. Like killers kill."
―Yoda[src]

"Humility endless is."
―Yoda[src]

Labyrinth of EvilEdit Labyrinth of Evil sectionEdit


"A labyrinth of evil, this war has become."
―Yoda[src]

"Sworn by oath to uphold you, we are."
―Yoda to Palpatine[src]

"From the dark path, no returning there is. Forever, the direction of your life it dominates."
―Yoda[src]

"To the Force, look for guidance. Accept what fate has placed before us."
―Yoda[src]

Star Wars: Empire at War: Forces of CorruptionEdit Star Wars: Empire at War: Forces of Corruption sectionEdit


"Yoda, you seek?"
―Yoda[src]

"My ally is the Force"
―Yoda[src]