Friday, August 29, 2014

Many sports teams in action today! Go Bucs!


Friday Aug 29th   JV Volleyball vs. Bishop Moore @ home, 5:30pm (Straz)

                             Varsity Volleyball vs. Bishop Moore @ home, 7pm (Straz)
                                                                (The BBN will broadcast this game live. Click here)
                                                               

                              Varsity Football @ Middleton HS, 7:30pm

Thursday, August 28, 2014

One of the trademarks of a champion is that he can outlast you. -Lou Brock





One of the trademarks of a champion is that he can outlast you. -Lou Brock

One of the trademarks of a champion is that he can outlast you. -Lou Brock





One of the trademarks of a champion is that he can outlast you. -Lou Brock

I should be suspicious of what I want

My Upper Division Convocation Address was based on this poem by Rumi, one of my favorite poets, and poems!

~Chaplain Carey




Who makes these changes?
By Jelalludin Rumi


Who makes these changes?
I shoot an arrow right.
It lands left.
I ride after a deer and find myself
chased by a hog.
I plot to get what I want
and end up in prison.
I dig pits to trap others
and fall in.

I should be suspicious
of what I want.

I should be suspicious of what I want

My Upper Division Convocation Address was based on this poem by Rumi, one of my favorite poets, and poems!

~Chaplain Carey




Who makes these changes?
By Jelalludin Rumi


Who makes these changes?
I shoot an arrow right.
It lands left.
I ride after a deer and find myself
chased by a hog.
I plot to get what I want
and end up in prison.
I dig pits to trap others
and fall in.

I should be suspicious
of what I want.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Article: Why I’m Asking You Not to Use Laptops

Interesting food for thought.  I definitely think there is a place for the use of laptops, but also we need to have deep conversations about whether every single moment in class a student should be perched behind a screen.

Why I’m Asking You Not to Use Laptops
by Anne Curzan in The Chronicle of Higher Education

At a teaching workshop last week, a new faculty member asked me how I felt about students using laptops in the classroom. I replied, “I ask students not to use laptops in my classroom—unless a student tells me they need or strongly prefer a laptop to take notes (for any reason), in which case we make that work.” She looked relieved to have this endorsement of a learning zone with fewer electronic distractions.
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I am far from alone in asking students not to use laptops (or phones) in class. Some of my colleagues, though, seem surprised that I don’t get pushback from students about this policy. I like to think it has something to do with my taking the time to explain my laptop policy for the class and then working hard to keep up my end of the contract.
Let me explain.
On the first day of class, students and I spend the first 30-40 minutes learning something new about how language works (in order to set the tone for the class), and then we go over the syllabus. When we get to the laptop policy, I pause and say, “Let me tell you why I ask you generally not to use laptops in class.” And here’s the gist of what I say after that:
First, if you have your laptop open, it is almost impossible not to check email or briefly surf the Internet, even if you don’t mean to or have told yourself that you won’t. I have the same impulse if I have my laptop open in a meeting. The problem is that studies indicate that this kind of multitasking impairs learning; once we are on email/the web, we are no longer paying very good attention to what is happening in class. (And there is no evidence I know of that “practice” at doing this kind of multitasking is going to make you better at it!)
Now I know that one could argue that it is your choice about whether you want to use this hour and 20 minutes to engage actively with the material at hand, or whether you would like to multitask. You’re not bothering anyone (one could argue) as you quietly do your email or check Facebook. Here’s the problem with that theory: From what we can tell, you are actually damaging the learning environment for others, even if you’re being quiet about it. A study published in 2013 found that not only did the multitasking student in a classroom do worse on a postclass test on the material, so did the peers who could see the computer. In other words, the off-task laptop use distracted not just the laptop user but also the group of students behind the laptop user. (And I get it, believe me. I was once in a lecture where the woman in front of me was shoe shopping, and I found myself thinking at one point, “No, not the pink ones!” I don’t remember all that much else about the lecture.)
Read it all HERE at the Chronicle of Higher Education


7 Things a Quiet Student Wishes Their Teacher Understood

Good food for thought in this article:



7 Things a Quiet Student Wishes Their Teacher Understood
By Marsha Pinto in the HuffingtonPost

The long held friction between teachers and students is one that has lasted for generations, with both sides frantically pointing fingers at each other's faults. There is the one side with teachers attempting to understand and correct their students behavior and the other side where students continue to grumble about how their teachers "just don't get them."
As the beginning of another school year approaches, students face the dreading reality of putting the sunny, less-stress summer days behind and preparing for the next 10 months of deadlines, papers, homework assignments, tests, grades and teachers that seem to not understand what it's like to be a student in 2014. While some students anticipate the teacher that gives less homework, is humorous, easy-going and fair, other students cross their fingers in hopes of the teacher that will understand and accept them for being quiet.
Who are these students? Well, they're often the ones you didn't know existed, the students who were mistakenly marked absent, the students who listened actively yet felt invisible.
For quiet students, another school year calls for the oh-so-familiar report card comments on participation and the series of unfortunate classroom events they've come to know all too well.
So teachers, listen up. Below are seven things you should know before you judge the quiet student(s) in your class this school year.
1. Being quiet doesn't make us any less smart
Teachers don't understand how frustrating it can get reading the comment, " _____ is a great student but he/she doesn't participate in class."
Remember that still waters run deep. I know that some teachers like to base grades on participation, but if you could only hear all the great ideas we have inside our head, you'd learn that we have some great ideas to share. In fact, we are practically masters of brainstorming.
However, it's difficult for us to master the art of jumping in to a conversation or interrupting. We may not raise our hands as quickly as you want us to or say as much as you wanted us to, but honestly we just like to take our time to process our ideas. Does it even make a difference if we write more than we speak?
2. We are not a problem that you need to solve.
So, we may not have participated on the first day, or the second day or the first three months of school but please don't keep pestering us about when we're going to talk. Sometimes there isn't a reason why we are so quiet, it's just part of who we are. Many people tend to assume that quiet people are stuck in this quiet prison and need to be rescued so that we can enjoy life. I can assure that this is not always the case. We quiet students are quite content with the way we are... until you start pointing out our faults. We often do not need the "help" you are suggesting, we just need your patience and understanding.
Read it all HERE

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

The Rev. Peter Carey Installed as Chaplain at Berkeley

August 25, 2014

The Rev. Peter Carey Installed as Chaplain at Berkeley

By From Staff Reports
TAMPA - The Rev. Peter Carey was installed Wednesday, Aug. 20 as chaplain to Berkeley Preparatory School, Tampa at the school's Straz Center.Carey, who replaces the The Rev. Doug Carter, arrived this summer from St. Paul’s Memorial Church in Charlottesville, Va., where he has served as senior associate rector since 2012. Prior to that appointment, he served as associate rector of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Va., and was also the school chaplain at St. Catherine’s Episcopal School in Richmond, Va.

The Installation with Bishop Smith and Headmaster Joseph Seivold included special gifts from students and faculty.

  • Christian students presented a Bible to Carey with the words, "Chaplain Carey, please accept this Bible – it is the Berkeley Bible and be among us as a man of the Word."
  • Sikh, Hindu, Jewish, Buddhist and Muslim students presented a “Golden Rules of All Religions” to "guide your service in a school whose doors are open to all people."
  • Upper division students and middle division Cope & Mitre Leaders presented him with board markers and a computer, "to signify your role as classroom teacher."
  • Middle Division Cope & Mitre Leaders presented Carey with a whistle and lanyard to "signify your role as a ‘coach’ to both students and faculty."
  • Faculty members presented Carey with a Book of Common Prayer, saying: "Chaplain Carey, please accept this Book of Common Prayer. We ask that you pray for the adults entrusted with the solemn privilege to care for the daily wellbeing of our students as we nurture their minds, bodies and spirits, and we present this gift to signify your role as chaplain to all of us."
  • Lastly, the Board Chair step forward and present a framed copy of the Mission Statement, saying: "Chaplain Carey, please accept this copy of the Berkeley Preparatory School Mission statement, as a reminder of your role in helping each student in our charge to develop morally, ethically, and spiritually."
Berkeley, founded in 1960, is one of 14 schools in the Diocese of Southwest Florida. For more information, visit www.berkeleyprep.org/

Good Article: Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School
by Katrina Schwartz
Posted at The KQED Blog, "MindShift"

The  first few days of school are a vital time to set the right tone for the rest of the year. Many teachers focus on important things like getting to know their students, building relationships and making sure students know what the classroom procedures will be. While those things are important, Alan November, a former teacher-turned-author and lecturer says the most important ideas to hammer home will help students learn on their own for the rest of the year.
POWER RESEARCHING
“The name of the game is to find the right information with the right question,” said November during a workshop at the 2014 gathering of the International Society of Technology in Education in Atlanta. “My job used to be to give you the information, now my job is to teach you how to find the information.” November firmly believes this dynamic needs to be made very clear in the first five days of school.
“The best teachers were kids who had really struggled with the material and really understand what it’s like to learn.”
Kids think they know how to use the internet to search and find the information they need, but November has found through many interviews and school visits that often students have no idea why Google or any other search provider works the way it does. And they don’t know how to phrase questions to get the answers they seek.
“Kids literally take their teachers assignment and Google it,” November said. “They don’t understand that Google doesn’t speak English or any other language.” He’s tested his theory in classrooms, asking students to research the Iran Hostage Crisis. Students inevitably Googled the event and cited the first few pages that came up. But every resource was written from a U.S. perspective on an event that affected two very different countries.
“Your kids are not thorough,” November said to the hundreds of educators gathered. “They don’t see what they don’t see, so it’s really important that teachers challenge what’s missing.” Even more important is for students to learn the syntax of searching. To find sources from Iran students need to type “site:ir” in order to direct a search engine to explore that part of the internet. Even using that trick doesn’t solve the problem because Iranians don’t call that event “Iran Hostage Crisis,” they call it “Conquest of the American Spy Den.”
“It’s my observation that we are not instilling a discipline and rigor of the grammar and syntax of the tool they are going to use more than anything else for homework,” November said. And worse, when he asked kids about the kinds of assignments teachers give, students said 85 to 90 percent of the answers could be found with a quick internet search.
“I think we should give kids problems that you can’t look up on the internet,” November said. “Or, if you do, build the capacity to do it well.” With the Iran Hostage Crises example, a teacher could require that students use sources from Iran, and could spend time brainstorming the right questions to ask a search engine to get the best information. These skills will help students throughout the rest of the school year and should be covered early.
“In the first 5 days I think we should front load really high level research skills,” November said. That means teaching students to “power search” using Google operators, the words that define how Google searches. “A lot of kids have never used the advanced system of Google algorithms,” November said. Without it, the internet is a vast space with little organization. November compared power searching to the Dewey Decimal System in a library – without it people are just wandering around a building hoping they find the right book.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Commitment

The person who has inspired me my whole life is my Mom, because she taught me commitment. She sacrificed.

~Mike Krzyzewski

10 Things Every College Student Needs to Know About Religion, by Martyn Oliver

I found this article compelling and quite spot-on.  A pretty good justification for religious studies.  I would, probably, go further and say that we also need to teach theology (especially in Independent Schools, and certainly in Episcopal Schools).

A thoughtful piece.

Chaplain Carey




10 Things Every College Student Needs to Know About Religion 

I love teaching students about religion. But we’d go deeper and further every semester if everyone understood these 10 basic ideas.

By Martyn Oliver
At FaithStreet

I'm about to take 100+ college students through their first course on religion, as I do every semester. Here’s what I wish they knew coming in (and, what I wish I’d known myself as an undergrad):

1. You don’t know what a “religion” is.

We tend to think of religion in terms of our own experiences with our own traditions. But religion is a slippery word. Did you know, for example, that the United States Armed Forces counts both Buddhism and Atheism as “religions”? Would your definition be wide enough to include them? Probably, because most of us agree that religions are sets of beliefs and practices shared by a community (and note: we can leave belief in a god out of the equation). But then, if you expand your definition just a little bit, Red Sox Nation or ComicCon cosplay start to look awfully “religious.” Are we cool with that?
As you study religion, your definition of it may get bigger, weirder, more slippery. I argue that the category of “religion” ought to remain a contested space, and what we hold to be elemental about our own tradition is not necessarily so for others.

2. History will screw with your beliefs.

Caesar did not call for a census that drove Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem — it just didn’t happen, despite what the Gospel of Luke says. Also, Buddhists have often been perpetrators of astounding violence, not only in contemporary Myanmar, but also in Japan, Tibet, and Thailand — peace, compassion, and mindfulness be damned. Religions tend to rewrite history, and the sooner we can come to terms with the discrepancies, fabrications, or willful ignorance of religious traditions, the better.
Just like it’s uncomfortable to confront the fact that slaves built the U.S. Capitol Building or that American settlers committed genocide against the Native People, the history of any religion forces us to grapple with the ugly realities of ourselves. This isn’t your professor being anti-Christian or anti-Buddhist — it’s just historical information. What you do with that information, however, matters. History doesn’t ask you to throw away a faith or dismiss religion altogether. Nor should it make you distrust academia for disseminating some nefarious agenda. Instead, at its best, history can help us ask how we make the future better.

3. If you call yourself religious, you might want to know something about your own tradition.

Some passing familiarity with the texts and traditions you hold sacred would be great. Some understanding of what makes your religion or sect different from religions a lot like yours would be wonderful. I’m not asking for the ability to cite scriptures chapter and verse, nor to explain John Wesley’s break from the Anglicans and the Moravians. But a general awareness about what one believes — and why, and why not — would be super helpful.
Too often, in intro courses, adherents of, say, Lutheranism, think they can skate through the Christianity unit, failing to recognize that Lutheranism and Christianity are not the same thing. Unfortunately, students usually have institutions and parents who do not foster a sense of consciousness about the peculiarities of their position. Once students recognize this, disenchantment often begins. That is never a professor’s intent, but students would be bettered fortified if they understood their tradition as having developed in particular ways and for particular reasons.
And if you can differentiate the Sermon on the Mount from the Ten Commandments, all the better.

4. All religions are not the same.

This issue is so critical that one of my mentors wrote a book about it. Different religions make different claims to truth, and the exclusivity of those claims matters. Students tend to accept and defer to pluralism without considering how they might be running roughshod over the claims of their own traditions. This is a good thing for civil society, but a problematic thing when it comes to explaining tensions between religions.
I spend weeks working to help people realize that while their neighbors’ faith may not (to paraphrase Thomas Jefferson) pick their pocket nor break their leg, it does seriously impinge upon assertions that one group of people is chosen and another is not. This matters. If it doesn’t, then you’ve sacrificed a part of your beliefs upon the altar of good manners. Not that I’m against manners, but we should know the consequences of our bargains.

5. Religions have good reasons for what they teach, do, and believe.

It might seem crazy to make offerings to a god with an elephant’s head, but only if you’re not familiar with Ganesha’s story and the obstacles he overcame to become who he is. From someone else’s perspective, it can appear equally nuts to worship a guy who managed to get himself arrested, beaten, and executed: what’s so great about martyrdom? Isn’t that rationalizing failure?
Read the rest HERE

Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go. ~ T.S. Eliot



Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go. ~ T.S. Eliot

Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go. ~ T.S. Eliot




Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go. ~ T.S. Eliot


Sunday, August 24, 2014

Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion. Martha Graham


Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion.

~Martha Graham

From Seth Godin's blog: Why drafting works



From Seth Godin's blog:

Why drafting works

The other day, a speedster on a bike passed me as I rode along the bike path. For the next ten minutes, I rode right behind him, drafting his progress.
Sure, there's an aerodynamic reason that this works--there's less wind resistance when you ride closely.
But the real reason is mental, not based on physics. Drafting works because, right in front of you is proof that you can go faster.
Without knowing it, you do this at work every day. We set our pace based on what competitors or co-workers are doing. One secret to making more of an impact, then, is figuring out who you intend to follow. Don't 'pace yourself,' instead, find someone to unknowningly pace you.

From Seth Godin's blog: Why drafting works



From Seth Godin's blog:

Why drafting works

The other day, a speedster on a bike passed me as I rode along the bike path. For the next ten minutes, I rode right behind him, drafting his progress.
Sure, there's an aerodynamic reason that this works--there's less wind resistance when you ride closely.
But the real reason is mental, not based on physics. Drafting works because, right in front of you is proof that you can go faster.
Without knowing it, you do this at work every day. We set our pace based on what competitors or co-workers are doing. One secret to making more of an impact, then, is figuring out who you intend to follow. Don't 'pace yourself,' instead, find someone to unknowningly pace you.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Service of Institution

We had a a wonderful Service of Institution of me as the Chaplain of Berkeley Preparatory School on Wednesday!

Many thanks to the Bishop of the Southwest Diocese of Florida, The Rt. Rev. Dabney Smith the Headmaster, Joseph Seivold, and the Chair of the Board, George Gramling who helped to install me as the new chaplain at this outstanding school.  In addition a dozen or so students and a group of faculty also played an essential role in the service.  Thank you all!

The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Chaplain




Thursday, August 21, 2014

A wonderful Service of Institution!

We had a a wonderful Service of Institution of me as the Chaplain of Berkeley Preparatory School on Wednesday!

Many thanks to the Bishop of the Southwest Diocese of Florida, The Rt. Rev. Dabney Smith the Headmaster, Joseph Seivold, and the Chair of the Board, George Gramling who helped to install me as the new chaplain at this outstanding school.  In addition a dozen or so students and a group of faculty also played an essential role in the service.  Thank you all!

The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Chaplain




Wednesday, August 20, 2014

From Patheos: Sunday Schooling Our Kids Out of Church

Sunday Schooling Our Kids Out of Church

About 40 years ago a profound shift took place in many Christian congregations across the country…for all the right reasons…with one troubling unintended consequence:

In the 1960’s and 1970’s, my generation, Baby Boomers, rebelled against the “institutional church” just as we did with every other institution our parents built/supported.  We rebelled by dropping out: 2/3rds of my generation dropped out of church.  In the late 1970’s/early 1980’s, innovative pastors and congregations of all sizes and denominations looked for ways to draw Boomers back to church.  They began to create worship experiences based on the unique “personality” of the Boomer generation. These churches went “contemporary,” “seeker,” and/or “seeker-friendly.”  Because these were the primary parenting years for Boomers, these congregations recognized the need to not only provide Boomer-friendly worship experiences for adults, but the need to create dynamic experiences for their children as well, knowing that if the kids wanted to come back, the parents were more likely to come back.  XX Sunday Morning-p7 dk

So began a shift from kids worshipping with the big people for one hour followed by all ages attending a second hour of Sunday School, to churches creating Sunday School experiences for kids that ran concurrently with their parents’ worship service.  In other words, kids and parents were separated from each other, having different Sunday experiences.

Again, the reasons were right…or so we thought.  Because these new Boomer services had a sense of evangelism about them (trying to win Boomers back to the church) we didn’t want anything to interrupt their focus…like squirming or crying or screaming kids. Church leaders sensed that Boomer parents wanted the one hour break from their kids—that they wanted to focus on their own spiritual life for an hour away from the distraction of their children.  And, again, we assumed, reasonably so, that worship targeted to adult boomers would not be all that engaging for kids.  So dynamic Sunday school programs were created to engage the kids at their level in their language while their parents were in worship.  In fact, some churches didn’t (and don’t) allow kids into big people worship at all.

The result: Many of these innovated congregations had a positive, significant impact on the lives of disenfranchised Boomers and their kids.  Many saw their congregations and their children’s ministries grow exponentially.  The evangelism imperative to reconnect with Boomers seemed to work.
But there was (and is) one huge unintended consequence:  We have raised the largest unchurched generation in the history of our country.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

What are the principal qualities that distinguish a school as Episcopal?

What Are the Principal Qualities That Distinguish a School as Episcopal?
National Association of Episcopal Schools

Posted: March 15, 2012

This question, more than any other, is asked of NAES by Episcopal school and Church leaders, parents, and the general public. The answer is that they are Christian communities whose missions integrate spiritual formation into all aspects of the educational experience. Episcopal schools are most distinctive when they are true to this mission and when they do so in the graceful and inclusive manner which is the hallmark of the Anglican approach to education over the centuries.

All Christian communities, even the most ecumenical and diverse of Episcopal schools, are upheld by the basic principles of the Baptismal Covenant. As expressed in the Book of Common Prayer, this Covenant maintains that individuals and institutions are called by God to adopt certain fundamental disciplines and dispositions in order to embrace fully their basic identities. As embodiments of the Christian faith, Episcopal schools are created to be communities that honor, celebrate and worship God as the center of life. They are created to be models of God’s love and grace. They are created to serve God in Christ in all persons, regardless of origin, background, ability, or religion. They are created to “strive for justice and peace among all people and [to] respect the dignity of every human being.” These principles are the basis on which identity and vocation are to be defined in Episcopal schools.

Episcopal schools have been established, however, not solely as communities for Christians, like a parish church, but as ecumenical and diverse ministries of educational and human formation for people of all faiths and backgrounds. Episcopal schools are populated by a rich variety of human beings, from increasingly diverse religious, cultural, and economic backgrounds. In fact, the intentional pluralism of most Episcopal schools is a hallmark of their missions. It is also a distinguishing characteristic of these schools that they seek to integrate religious and spiritual formation into the overall curriculum and life of each school community. Episcopal schools are clear, yet graceful, about how they articulate and express their basic identities, especially in their religious curricula and traditions. They invite all who attend and work in them—Episcopalians and non-Episcopalians, Christians and non-Christians, people of no faith tradition—both to seek clarity about their own beliefs and religions and to honor those traditions more fully and faithfully in their own lives. Above all, Episcopal schools exist not merely to educate, but to demonstrate and proclaim the unique worth and beauty of all human beings as creations of a loving, empowering God.

In practice, these principles and ideals are expressed through
·       School Worship that is creative, inclusive, draws fully upon the liturgical resources of The Episcopal Church, and is a regular part of school life for all faculty and students.
·       Community Life, in which reflection, prayer, and matters of the spirit are honored and cultivated and the physical, mental, and emotional health of all are supported and nurtured.
·       Religious Formation and Study that is meaningful, academically substantive, and age-appropriate; and in teaching the Christian tradition, fosters dialogue with other faith traditions.
·       Social Justice, which is the integration of the ideals and concepts of equity, justice, and a just society throughout the life of the school; the embracing and honoring of diversity; and the inclusion of community service and service-learning as an integral part of the life of the school.
By weaving these principles into the very fabric of the school’s overall life, Episcopal schools ensure that their missions are built on the sure foundation of a Christian love that guides and challenges all who attend our schools to build lives of genuine meaning, purpose and service in the world they will inherit.

- See more at: http://www.episcopalschools.org/library/articles/2012/03/15/what-are-the-principal-qualities-that-distinguish-a-school-as-episcopal-#sthash.wMGhvxr8.dpuf