Friday, October 31, 2014

"Chance favors the prepared mind." ~Louis Pasteur #qftpp



"Chance favors the prepared mind." ~Louis Pasteur  

With School Ban Nearing End, New York City Works on How and When to Allow Cellphones

I'm pretty surprised that NYC has held off on allowing students to have cell phones until now!

With School Ban Nearing End, New York City Works on How and When to Allow Cellphones




As New York prepares to lift its longstanding ban on cellphones carried by students in schools, it joins an increasing number of cities, including Chicago and Miami, where school leaders are yielding to the ubiquity of mobile phones and the futility of trying to keep them out of the classroom.
In an era when many parents want constant access to their children and students live in a digital social milieu, banning cellphones from schools is increasingly seen as counterproductive. And teachers are experimenting with technology and finding that the miniature computers many students carry in their pockets can be valuable classroom tools.
Schools are trying out various policies, with some permitting students to use their phones only during breaks or at lunch. Others are encouraging students to bring cellphones to school, where teachers invite them to conduct web searches or view educational videos. Even in districts with bans in place, educators realize they cannot stop students from using their phones.
“I don’t think it’s going to be very long before it becomes very standard” for schools to allow all students to carry cellphones, said Daniel A. Domenech, executive director of the American Association of School Administrators. “I think the horse is pretty much out of the barn in general.”
Read it all HERE

Bill Maher Isn’t the Only One Who Misunderstands Religion


Bill Maher Isn’t the Only One Who Misunderstands Religion



BILL MAHER’s recent rant against Islam has set off a fierce debate about the problem of religious violence, particularly when it comes to Islam.
Mr. Maher, who has argued that Islam is unlike other religions (he thinks it’s more “like the Mafia”), recently took umbrage with President Obama’s assertion that the terrorist group known as the Islamic State, or ISIS, does not represent Islam. In Mr. Maher’s view, Islam has “too much in common with ISIS.”
Read it all HERE at the NYTimes

30 Days of Gratitude! "Thanks & Giving" inspired by the Young Clergy Women Project!



I'm jumping on this gratitude bandwagon that The Young Clergy Women Project have going! Working to live a life of gratitude! ‪#‎30daysofgratitude‬ ‪#‎ThanksLiving14‬ #abundance #abundantlife
http://youngclergywomen.org/thanks-giving/


With School Ban Nearing End, New York City Works on How and When to Allow Cellphones

I'm pretty surprised that NYC has held off on allowing students to have cell phones until now!

With School Ban Nearing End, New York City Works on How and When to Allow Cellphones




As New York prepares to lift its longstanding ban on cellphones carried by students in schools, it joins an increasing number of cities, including Chicago and Miami, where school leaders are yielding to the ubiquity of mobile phones and the futility of trying to keep them out of the classroom.
In an era when many parents want constant access to their children and students live in a digital social milieu, banning cellphones from schools is increasingly seen as counterproductive. And teachers are experimenting with technology and finding that the miniature computers many students carry in their pockets can be valuable classroom tools.



Schools are trying out various policies, with some permitting students to use their phones only during breaks or at lunch. Others are encouraging students to bring cellphones to school, where teachers invite them to conduct web searches or view educational videos. Even in districts with bans in place, educators realize they cannot stop students from using their phones.
“I don’t think it’s going to be very long before it becomes very standard” for schools to allow all students to carry cellphones, said Daniel A. Domenech, executive director of the American Association of School Administrators. “I think the horse is pretty much out of the barn in general.”
Read it all HERE

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Bill Maher Isn’t the Only One Who Misunderstands Religion


Bill Maher Isn’t the Only One Who Misunderstands Religion



BILL MAHER’s recent rant against Islam has set off a fierce debate about the problem of religious violence, particularly when it comes to Islam.
Mr. Maher, who has argued that Islam is unlike other religions (he thinks it’s more “like the Mafia”), recently took umbrage with President Obama’s assertion that the terrorist group known as the Islamic State, or ISIS, does not represent Islam. In Mr. Maher’s view, Islam has “too much in common with ISIS.”


Read it all HERE at the NYTimes

Go Bucs!! Girls soccer wins in OT!

The Varsity Girls Soccer team played for the second night in a row in the Wharton Invitational Tournament, in what turned out to be a back and forth battle against 6A power Plant High School.   The lady Bucs showed great effort and determination in gaining respect as little Berkeley played big on the field  and on the scoreboard, demonstrating composure and skill on their way to a 4-4 tie.  Keeping plant on its heels for most of the first half, the Berkeley 11 led at the break 3-2,  with goals by Shannon Martin , Dana Manning and Maddie Ide.  The second half was filled with  back and forth action as both teams had some great opportunities on goal.   Plant tied things up at 3-3 with 20 minutes to go, only to see Berkeley go back on top as Shannon Martin put the ball in the back of the net with 15 minutes left on the clock.  Plant continued to fight on and scored a late goal to notch it up with just  under 2 minutes to play for the equalizer at 4-4.  The pressure packed PK shootout would decide the team that would advance to Saturdays Tournament Championship. Berkeley was denied on their first attempt providing momentum to the Plant side, but Berkeley Keeper Valentina  Estrada took control stopping Plants 1st attempt with cat like quickness to bring her team back to even. After both teams scored to keep things knotted in the second round, Estrada again put her team on her back as she calmly sidestepped to her right and made another big save to put the Bucs back in front.  With strong and well placed shots from her teammates  the lady Bucs finished off the Panthers 4-2 in the shoot out with goals from Seniors Julianne Tanella, Emily Weissman, Dana Manning along with Sophomore Ellie Laxer.  Next up the Tournament Championship on Saturday at 1:10pm at Palm Harbor HS. 

Monday, October 27, 2014

WHY TEACHING KINDNESS IN SCHOOLS IS ESSENTIAL TO REDUCE BULLYING

WHY TEACHING KINDNESS IN SCHOOLS IS ESSENTIAL TO REDUCE BULLYING

OCTOBER 17, 2014

Phrases like "random acts of kindness" and "pay it forward" have become popular terms in modern society. Perhaps this could be best explained by those who have identified a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism.
It seems that we just can't get enough of those addictive, feel-good emotions -- and with good reason. Scientific studies prove that kindness has many physical, emotional, and mental health benefits. And children need a healthy dose of the warm-and-fuzzies to thrive as healthy, happy, well-rounded individuals.
Patty O'Grady, PhD, an expert in neuroscience, emotional learning, and positive psychology, specializes in education. She reports:
Kindness changes the brain by the experience of kindness. Children and adolescents do not learn kindness by only thinking about it and talking about it. Kindness is best learned by feeling it so that they can reproduce it.
A great number of benefits have been reported to support teaching kindness in schools, best summed up by the following.

Happy, Caring Children

The good feelings that we experience when being kind are produced by endorphins. They activate areas of the brain that are associated with pleasure, social connection, and trust. These feelings of joyfulness are proven to be contagious and encourage more kind behavior (also known asaltruism) by the giver and recipient.
Read the rest HERE at Edutopia 

Why Teaching Kindness in Schools Is Essential to Reduce Bullying

Why Teaching Kindness in Schools Is Essential to Reduce Bullying

OCTOBER 17, 2014

Phrases like "random acts of kindness" and "pay it forward" have become popular terms in modern society. Perhaps this could be best explained by those who have identified a deficiency in their lives that can only be fulfilled by altruism.
It seems that we just can't get enough of those addictive, feel-good emotions -- and with good reason. Scientific studies prove that kindness has many physical, emotional, and mental health benefits. And children need a healthy dose of the warm-and-fuzzies to thrive as healthy, happy, well-rounded individuals.
Patty O'Grady, PhD, an expert in neuroscience, emotional learning, and positive psychology, specializes in education. She reports:
Kindness changes the brain by the experience of kindness. Children and adolescents do not learn kindness by only thinking about it and talking about it. Kindness is best learned by feeling it so that they can reproduce it.
A great number of benefits have been reported to support teaching kindness in schools, best summed up by the following.

Happy, Caring Children

The good feelings that we experience when being kind are produced by endorphins. They activate areas of the brain that are associated with pleasure, social connection, and trust. These feelings of joyfulness are proven to be contagious and encourage more kind behavior (also known asaltruism) by the giver and recipient.
Read the rest HERE at Edutopia 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

"It is the province of knowledge to speak. And it is the privilege of wisdom to listen." ~Oliver Wendell Holmes


"It is the province of knowledge to speak. And it is the privilege of wisdom to listen."

~Oliver Wendell Holmes

"It is the province of knowledge to speak. And it is the privilege of wisdom to listen." (Oliver Wendell Holmes


"It is the province of knowledge to speak. And it is the privilege of wisdom to listen."

~Oliver Wendell Holmes

10 Things Food Banks Need But Won’t Ask For


10 Things Food Banks Need But Won’t Ask For

Getty Images, Justin Sullivan

Some items are in high demand at the food bank and you may not realize it. Because they aren’t essentials, the staff doesn’t publicly ask for them. A survey on Reddit.com asked volunteers what items people would be most appreciative of and we’ve listed the top 10 below. If you’re looking for an easy way to help out, pick some of these up while shopping and drop them off at one of our area food banks.

1. Spices.


Think about it. People who rely on the food bank eat a lot of canned food, rice, oatmeal, white bread, etc. They love spices. Seasoned salt, cayenne pepper, chili powder, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, oregano, basil and so on.


2. Feminine Products.


Can you imagine being worried about affording these? Pads, tampons, panty liners, etc. Recommended: Buy in bulk at Costco for donating.


3. Chocolate.


People don’t need it, but think about being in their shoes and how nice it would be to be given a chocolate bar or brownie mix along with your essentials.


4. Toiletries.


Grocery stores are great about donating surplus or unsold food, but they have no reason to donate toilet paper, tooth paste, soap, deodorant, shampoo, etc. Food stamps often don’t cover these.


5. Canned meats and jerky.


This isn’t true of all food banks, but some struggle to give users enough protein.


6. Crackers and tortillas.


They don’t spoil and everybody likes them.


7. Baby toiletries.


Diapers, baby wipes, baby formula, baby shampoo, baby soap, baby food, bottles, etc.


8. Soup packets.


Sometimes you look at rice, beans, instant potatoes, and cans of vegetable and think, “What do I make with this?” Hearty soup is a complete meal.


9. Socks.


From a former homeless person: “Socks mean the world to you. They keep you warm, make you feel like you have something new, and just comfort you.”


10. Canned fruit other than pineapple.

Food banks get a lot of pineapple donated. Their clients love it when other kinds of fruit are available.


And remember! Food banks love cash donations because it allows them to buy whatever they need!


Read More: 10 Things Food Banks Need But Won't Ask For | http://1027kord.com/10-things-food-banks-need-but-wont-ask-for/?trackback=fbshare&trackback=tsmclip

From WIRED: American Schools are Training Kids for a World that Doesn't Exist


American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn’t Exist


  • BY DAVID EDWARDS  
  •    
  • 6:30 AM  |  
  •  
  • PERMALINK
    • Are Americans getting dumber?
Our math skills are falling. Ourreading skills are weakening. Our children have become less literate than children in many developed countries. But the crisis in American education may be more than a matter of sliding rankings on world educational performance scales.
Our kids learn within a system of education devised for a world that increasingly does not exist.
To become a chef, a lawyer, a philosopher or an engineer, has always been a matter of learning what these professionals do, how and why they do it, and some set of general facts that more or less describe our societies and our selves. We pass from kindergarten through twelfth grade, from high school to college, from college to graduate and professional schools, ending our education at some predetermined stage to become the chef, or the engineer, equipped with a fair understanding of what being a chef, or an engineer, actually is and will be for a long time.
We “learn,” and after this we “do.” We go to school and then we go to work.
This approach does not map very well to personal and professional success in America today. Learning and doing have become inseparable in the face of conditions that invite us to discover.
read the rest HERE