Monday, November 30, 2015

Feast of St. Andrew

Feast of St. Andrew, the great bridge-maker and "introducer" of Jesus to others!



Almighty God, who gave such grace to your apostle Andrew that he readily obeyed the call of your Son Jesus Christ, and brought his brother with him: Give us, who are called by your Holy Word, grace to follow him without delay, and to bring those near to us into his gracious presence; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Matthew 4:18-22

As Jesus walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea-- for they were fishermen. And he said to them, "Follow me, and I will make you fish for people." Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

Good article on meditation in schools

I read a really nice article on meditation in schools that was posted at Outside Magazine Online.  An excerpt is below and click the link to read the entire article.

~Chaplain Carey


Meditation Should be Taught in School

Instruction in the art of mindfulness is emerging in grade schools around the country to help children relax, focus, and help others. But it still has a long way to go to become part of the curriculum nationwide.

On a recent Thursday just after lunch, 20 first-graders gathered in a circle on the carpeted floor of their public school classroom in Santa Fe. Some sat cross-legged and others on their knees, each with one hand clasped in front of them or resting on their stomachs. Their teacher, Katie Norton, sat with them on a low crate and jingled a little bell. The children closed their eyes, looking surprisingly tranquil, even a little sleepy. But they weren't settling in for an afternoon nap. They were practicing meditation.

Read the rest HERE at Outside Online





Feast of St. Andrew

Feast of St. Andrew, the great bridge-maker and "introducer" of Jesus to others!



Almighty God, who gave such grace to your apostle Andrew that he readily obeyed the call of your Son Jesus Christ, and brought his brother with him: Give us, who are called by your Holy Word, grace to follow him without delay, and to bring those near to us into his gracious presence; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Matthew 4:18-22

As Jesus walked by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon, who is called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea-- for they were fishermen. And he said to them, "Follow me, and I will make you fish for people." Immediately they left their nets and followed him. As he went from there, he saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee and his brother John, in the boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets, and he called them. Immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed him.

Video Advent Calendar - Day 2 - Meet Brother Geoffrey

Video Advent Calendar - Day 2 - Meet Brother Geoffrey

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Cast away the works of darkness!




Almighty God, give us grace to cast away the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light, now in the time of this mortal life in which your Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the living and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Advent 1 - Cast away the works of darkness!




Almighty God, give us grace to cast away the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light, now in the time of this mortal life in which your Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the living and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Saturday, November 28, 2015

Attentiveness




"This is the first, wildest, and wisest thing I know, that the soul exists and that it is built entirely out of attentiveness." —Mary Oliver

Attentiveness




"This is the first, wildest, and wisest thing I know, that the soul exists and that it is built entirely out of attentiveness." —Mary Oliver

The task of education




“It is the foremost task of education to insure the survival of these qualities: an enterprising curiosity, an undefeatable spirit, tenacity in pursuit, readiness for sensible denial, and above all, compassion.” 

~Kurt Hahn, Outward Bound Founder

The task of education




“It is the foremost task of education to insure the survival of these qualities: an enterprising curiosity, an undefeatable spirit, tenacity in pursuit, readiness for sensible denial, and above all, compassion.” 

~Kurt Hahn, Outward Bound Founder

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Prayers from the service of Compline




Prayers from the service of Compline 

Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy
defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the
love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the hours
of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and
chances of this life may rest in your eternal changelessness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Look down, O Lord, from your heavenly throne, and
illumine this night with your celestial brightness; that by
night as by day your people may glorify your holy Name;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Visit this place, O Lord, and drive far from it all snares of the
enemy; let your holy angels dwell with us to preserve us in
peace; and let your blessing be upon us always; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or
weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who
sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless
the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the
joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.

O God, your unfailing providence sustains the world we live
in and the life we live: Watch over those, both night and day,
who work while others sleep, and grant that we may never
forget that our common life depends upon each other's toil;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayers from the service of Compline




Prayers from the service of Compline 

Be our light in the darkness, O Lord, and in your great mercy
defend us from all perils and dangers of this night; for the
love of your only Son, our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.

Be present, O merciful God, and protect us through the hours
of this night, so that we who are wearied by the changes and
chances of this life may rest in your eternal changelessness;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Look down, O Lord, from your heavenly throne, and
illumine this night with your celestial brightness; that by
night as by day your people may glorify your holy Name;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Visit this place, O Lord, and drive far from it all snares of the
enemy; let your holy angels dwell with us to preserve us in
peace; and let your blessing be upon us always; through Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.

Keep watch, dear Lord, with those who work, or watch, or
weep this night, and give your angels charge over those who
sleep. Tend the sick, Lord Christ; give rest to the weary, bless
the dying, soothe the suffering, pity the afflicted, shield the
joyous; and all for your love's sake. Amen.

O God, your unfailing providence sustains the world we live
in and the life we live: Watch over those, both night and day,
who work while others sleep, and grant that we may never
forget that our common life depends upon each other's toil;
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Open my lips. O Lord




Open my lips, O Lord, *
    and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
Create in me a clean heart, O God, *
    and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from your presence *
    and take not your holy Spirit from me.
Give me the joy of your saving help again *
    and sustain me with your bountiful Spirit.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
    as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

~From Psalm 51

Open my lips, O Lord




Open my lips, O Lord, *
    and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
Create in me a clean heart, O God, *
    and renew a right spirit within me.
Cast me not away from your presence *
    and take not your holy Spirit from me.
Give me the joy of your saving help again *
    and sustain me with your bountiful Spirit.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit: *
    as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

~From Psalm 51

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Why Affluent Parents Put So Much Pressure on Their Kids



Why Affluent Parents Put So Much Pressure on Their Kids

For the most successful Americans, prosperity feels fragile.

With financial success ought to come some measure of relief—a chance to take in a deep breath, exhale, and survey the world from the top.
But, as Hanna Rosin’s recent Atlantic cover story on the high rate of suicide among high-school students in Palo Alto, California, captures, that’s not how things work. To the contrary, kids living in one of the wealthiest zip codes in the country are stressed and miserable. As Rosin writes:
On the surface, the rich kids seem to be thriving. They have cars, nice clothes, good grades, easy access to health care, and, on paper, excellent prospects. But many of them are not navigating adolescence successfully.
The rich middle- and high-school kids [Yale professor Suniya] Luthar and her collaborators have studied show higher rates of alcohol and drug abuse on average than poor kids, and much higher rates than the national norm. They report clinically significant depression or anxiety or delinquent behaviors at a rate two to three times the national average. Starting in seventh grade, the rich cohort includes just as many kids who display troubling levels of delinquency as the poor cohort, although the rule-breaking takes different forms. The poor kids, for example, fight and carry weapons more frequently, which Luthar explains as possibly self-protective. The rich kids, meanwhile, report higher levels of lying, cheating, and theft.
Why is this? As Rosin reports, a major factor is “pressure”—from parents, teachers, themselves, whoever—to excel not just in school but in a host of other activities as well. All of that pressure and the resulting hyper-activity seem to leave kids feeling very tired, very inadequate, and very alone. No wonder they are miserable.
Read it all HERE

Friday, November 20, 2015

The Parable of the Good Samaritan



Luke 10:25-37New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)

The Parable of the Good Samaritan

25 Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus.[a] “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 26 He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?” 27 He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” 28 And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”
29 But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” 30 Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. 32 So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii,[b] gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’ 36 Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?” 37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

Footnotes:

  1. Luke 10:25 Gk him
  2. Luke 10:35 The denarius was the usual day’s wage for a laborer
New Revised Standard Version (NRSV)
New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright © 1989 the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Reflections on the recent events in Paris

Upper Division Convocation
The Rev. Peter M. Carey
Berkeley Preparatory School, Tampa, Florida
19 November 2015

Let us pray

Grant, O God, that your holy and life-giving Spirit may so move every human heart, that barriers which divide us may crumble, suspicions disappear, and hatreds cease; that our divisions being healed, we may live in justice and peace. Amen.

We have been reminded all too often in recent times of the ways that religion can be bent and perverted to evil uses. 

And so, it is very important to remember what former president, George Bush stated just six days after 9-11 when he spoke at the Islamic Center in Washington, DC:

“The face of terror is not the true faith of Islam.  That’s not what Islam is all about.  Islam is peace.  These terrorists represent evil and war.  When we think of Islam we think of a faith that brings comfort to a billion people around the world.  Billions of people find comfort and solace and peace.  And that’s made brothers and sisters out of every race – out of every race.  (America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens, and Muslims make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country.  Muslims are doctors, lawyers, law professors, members of the military, entrepeneurs, shopkeepers, moms and dads.  And they need to be treated with respect.)  In our anger and emotion, our fellow Americans must treat each other with respect.”

These are helpful words to remember as we continue to learn more about these terrible attacks, and consider the best way to counter the despicable acts by these fringe groups.  Like many of you, France is close to my heart.  My parents visit France each year, and were just recently there this Fall.  I myself love France and have spent time right where some of these attacks occurred.

Just as Paris was reeling, I received word from my friend and former headmaster Ham Clark (the cousin of two Berkeley students) who is now head of a school in Beirut that his school community is also reeling from multiple bombings nearby. 

And so, like you perhaps, I am feeling many emotions: anger, fear, sadness, helplessness … so, how might we respond.  I would pray that we respond with the desire to learn as much as we can about these events, while also holding true to the “better angels of our natures.”

One Parisian who is living in the US had this quite profound response:

"It is so easy to hate. It is so much harder to quell and extinguish hatred, especially at moments like this. But, if we are to be victorious in this struggle, we must begin by owning our own selves and exercising self-control. We must not allow ISIS to plant their evil banner in our hearts and souls...We have to unite to fight this evil and mourn the loss of these young lives, not just in Paris but in Egypt, in Lebanon, in India, to name a few places." ~Christele Furey

As our own French student, Charly Pollet shared the other day:

“We fight terrorism with love, compassion, and joy (joie de vivre)  by cherishing our life, being thankful for each and everyday.  Remember the French community around the world and here at Berkeley as well as the victims of terrorism everywhere.  “Live as if you were to die tomorrow, learn as if you were to live forever”- Gandhi

One way that Parisians are standing up to terror is by the simple, and yet profound, act of returning to their beloved cafes – the very places which were the sites of some of these violent acts.  And so, as I again ask us to pray, I lift my coffee cup to those Parisians, those citizens of Beirut, of Egypt, of India, and elsewhere who are standing up to this evil. 


Let us pray


Almighty God.  Broaden our minds and hearts so that we may find solutions to terrible situations while also acting out of compassion and loving kindness.  Help us to seek the good, while we also root out evil.  Help us to see recognize the interconnectedness of our ever shrinking world and to see one another as fellow brothers and sisters.  Amen.


Convocation reflection on recent terror attacks

Upper Division Convocation
The Rev. Peter M. Carey
Berkeley Preparatory School, Tampa, Florida
19 November 2015

Let us pray

Grant, O God, that your holy and life-giving Spirit may so move every human heart, that barriers which divide us may crumble, suspicions disappear, and hatreds cease; that our divisions being healed, we may live in justice and peace. Amen.

We have been reminded all too often in recent times of the ways that religion can be bent and perverted to evil uses. 

And so, it is very important to remember what former president, George Bush stated just six days after 9-11 when he spoke at the Islamic Center in Washington, DC:

“The face of terror is not the true faith of Islam.  That’s not what Islam is all about.  Islam is peace.  These terrorists represent evil and war.  When we think of Islam we think of a faith that brings comfort to a billion people around the world.  Billions of people find comfort and solace and peace.  And that’s made brothers and sisters out of every race – out of every race.  (America counts millions of Muslims amongst our citizens, and Muslims make an incredibly valuable contribution to our country.  Muslims are doctors, lawyers, law professors, members of the military, entrepeneurs, shopkeepers, moms and dads.  And they need to be treated with respect.)  In our anger and emotion, our fellow Americans must treat each other with respect.”

These are helpful words to remember as we continue to learn more about these terrible attacks, and consider the best way to counter the despicable acts by these fringe groups.  Like many of you, France is close to my heart.  My parents visit France each year, and were just recently there this Fall.  I myself love France and have spent time right where some of these attacks occurred.

Just as Paris was reeling, I received word from my friend and former headmaster Ham Clark (the cousin of two Berkeley students) who is now head of a school in Beirut that his school community is also reeling from multiple bombings nearby. 

And so, like you perhaps, I am feeling many emotions: anger, fear, sadness, helplessness … so, how might we respond.  I would pray that we respond with the desire to learn as much as we can about these events, while also holding true to the “better angels of our natures.”

As our own French student, Charly Pollet shared the other day:

“We fight terrorism with love, compassion, and joy (joie de vivre)  by cherishing our life, being thankful for each and everyday.  Remember the French community around the world and here at Berkeley as well as the victims of terrorism everywhere.  “Live as if you were to die tomorrow, learn as if you were to live forever”- Gandhi

One way that Parisians are standing up to terror is by the simple, and yet profound, act of returning to their beloved cafes – the very places which were the sites of some of these violent acts.  And so, as I again ask us to pray, I lift my coffee cup to those Parisians, those citizens of Beirut, of Egypt, of India, and elsewhere who are standing up to this evil. 


Let us pray


Almighty God.  Broaden our minds and hearts so that we may find solutions to terrible situations while also acting out of compassion and loving kindness.  Help us to seek the good, while we also root out evil.  Help us to see recognize the interconnectedness of our ever shrinking world and to see one another as fellow brothers and sisters.  Amen.


Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Lead from trust, hope, and faith



We have places of fear inside of us, but we have other places as well—places with names like trust and hope and faith. We can choose to lead from one of those places, to stand on ground that is not riddled with the fault lines of fear, to move toward others from a place of promise instead of anxiety. As we stand in one of those places, fear may remain close at hand and our spirits may still tremble. But now we stand on ground that will support us, ground from which we can lead others toward a more trustworthy, more hopeful, more faithful way of being in the world.  

      ~Parker Palmer

Lead from trust, hope and faith



We have places of fear inside of us, but we have other places as well—places with names like trust and hope and faith. We can choose to lead from one of those places, to stand on ground that is not riddled with the fault lines of fear, to move toward others from a place of promise instead of anxiety. As we stand in one of those places, fear may remain close at hand and our spirits may still tremble. But now we stand on ground that will support us, ground from which we can lead others toward a more trustworthy, more hopeful, more faithful way of being in the world.  

      ~Parker Palmer

Monday, November 16, 2015

Prayer for all who suffer

By Jean Jullien


Almighty God, pour out your grace and peace upon all those who suffer today.  For those who are reeling from the attacks in France and Lebanon, and all those throughout the world who are in harm's way, we pray that they might feel the blessing of your healing power.  We know that what appears impossible to us is within your power to grant.  Send your Holy Spirit among us, and enliven us to find solutions to difficult problems, to bring peace where there is war, to bring understanding where there is confusion, and to bring love where there is hate.  All this we ask through your son, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

(The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Chaplain, Berkeley Preparatory School)

Prayer for all who suffer

By Jean Jullien


Almighty God, pour out your grace and peace upon all those who suffer today.  For those who are reeling from the attacks in France and Lebanon, and all those throughout the world who are in harm's way, we pray that they might feel the blessing of your healing power.  We know that what appears impossible to us is within your power to grant.  Send your Holy Spirit among us, and enliven us to find solutions to difficult problems, to bring peace where there is war, to bring understanding where there is confusion, and to bring love where there is hate.  All this we ask through your son, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

(The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Chaplain, Berkeley Preparatory School)

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Schoolhouse Rock rocked at Berkeley Preparatory School!




Great article: Set Your Kids Free: 10 Things They Need to Be Able to Do on Their Own by Middle School


Set Your Kids Free: 10 Things They Need to Be Able to Do on Their Own by Middle School
From elizabethstitt.com 

 It used to be that kids were treated as mini adults, and now the pendulum has swung the other way and young adults are being treated (and acting) as overgrown kids.  You have probably heard about the damage of being a too intense parent--whether that means tiger mom or helicopter parent.  Now you may be wondering what should you be expecting of your child?  The early childhood markers of independence--sitting, walking, potty training, etc.--get talked about a lot, but what is reasonable to expect of our older children is not as clear.  Just what should our early adolescent/ middle school kids be able to do on their own?
    I started thinking about this from the kids' point of view.  That made me remember the children's literature I grew up on.  Many of my favorite books were about young people taking charge independently--often away from their parents.  Let's start with Enid Blyton's The Famous Five series.  Beginning with Five on a Treasure Island, five cousins spend the summer having one adventure after the next.  There is home base where meals are offered and the children check in, but the assumption of the adults seems to be that as long as they are out in the fresh air, together, that they are generally fine no matter what they are getting up to.  In the Swallows and Amazon books by Arthur Ransome, six children are given permission to camp on an island in the middle of a lake.  They cook over open fires and deal with the local "natives" (as the children refer to the adults) to procure supplies.  Another popular example of kids on a mission is From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg. ...
Read it all HERE

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Happy Diwali!

At Berkeley Preparatory School, we are blessed with a diversity of students from an array of religious and cultural traditions.  We are blessed by having a good number of Hindus and Sikhs who are celebrating Diwali and Deepavali this week!

Happy Diwali!

~Chaplain Carey



Veterans' Day Prayers


FOR OUR ARMED FORCES
    Heavenly Father, we commend to thy gracious care and keeping all the men and women in our Armed Forces at home and abroad. Defend them day by day with thy heavenly grace; strengthen them in their trials and temptations; give them courage to face the perils that beset them; and help them to know that none can pluck out of thy hand those who put their trust in thee; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

FOR ALL IN THE SERVICE OF OUR COUNTRY
    O Almighty Lord God, who neither slumberest nor sleepest; Protect and assist, we beseech thee, all those who at home or abroad, by land, by sea, or in the air, are serving this country, that they, being armed with thy defense, may be preserved evermore in all perils; and being filled with wisdom and girded with strength, may do their duty to thy honour and glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen

Thank a Veteran

Today is a day to remember and honor the veterans of the United States of America and also a day to remember the Armistice (end of fighting) on the 11th month of the 11th Day in 1918 when the "War to End All Wars" came to an end. Of course, it was not the war to end all wars and our veterans have born the greatest burdens in this century as we have sent them into harm's way countless times. I have many friends who are veterans and I honor their sacrifice and their dedication on this day while I also pray and work for peace in our time.

So, thank a veteran today and also work for peace and justice!




Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Monday, November 09, 2015

Keep watch, dear Lord


True community



Our communities will become true and deep when we realize that we are each Children of God, and, as such, we are responsible to, and for, one another.  The root of this relationship is love, kindness, and the "loving-kindness" or "chesed" that God displays to us throughout scripture, and hopefully through our families and friends.  This rootedness in love and kindness should give us the assurance that we are not sole individuals in the wide Cosmos, but are actually tied together with one another, like members of a team, members of a squad, members of a family, members of a sisterhood or brotherhood.

A reminder from the scripture, from today's Morning Prayer from the Book of Common Prayer:


You are no longer strangers and sojourners, but fellow 
citizens with the saints and members of the household of 
God.    Ephesians 2:19

Thursday, November 05, 2015

Proud of Brad Mayes doing good things at Lehigh!

Freshman quarterback Brad Mayes got an earlier start to his Lehigh career than he expected

Wednesday, November 04, 2015

For all the saints


For All the Saints 
For all the saints who from their labor rest,
Who Thee by faith before the world confessed,
Thy name, O Jesus, be forever blessed,
Alleluia! Alleluia!

O blest communion, fellowship divine.
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine;
Yet all are one in Thee, for all are Thine.
Alleluia! Alleluia!

And when the fight is fierce, the warfare long,
Steals on the ear the distant triumph song,
And hearts are brave again, and arms are strong.
Alleluia! Alleluia.

From earth's wide bounds, from ocean's farthest coast,
Through gates of pearl streams in the countless host,
Singing to Father, Son and Holy Ghost,
Alleluia! Alleluia!


(1864) (William How)

Monday, November 02, 2015

Bishop Curry becomes the Episcopal Church's Presiding Bishop


See his sermon HERE


Bishop Curry becomes the Episcopal Church's Presiding Bishop


See his sermon HERE



Blessed All Souls Day


Today is All Souls Day!

Several years ago I was blessed to spend the day at Westminster Abbey on November 2nd...and I wrote about it below...

May you have a blessed All Souls Day,

~The Rev. Peter M. Carey










photo credit

Several years ago while in college, I was studying in Europe and made a trip up to England to visit a friend and to see some of the sights there.  I was excited that my friend was staying in Kent, and I would be able to go to Canterbury Cathedral to attend church and poke around in the town.  But, before going to Kent, I was in London in early November, visiting museums and churches, and doing the tourist thing.  On November 2nd, I made my way over to Westminster Abbey, where I was to meet up with one of the canons of the Abbey.  A mutual friend made the connection for me, and I was exploring the Abbey on a terribly rainy and cold day.

Not being totally keyed into the liturgical calendar, I was able to learn a bit about All Souls Day while in Westminster Abbey.  Since it was such a cold and rainy day, and since there are endless things to see and to visit, I stayed there much of the day.  Since All Souls Day is also known as the Feast of the Faithful Departed when many Christians remember all those who have died in the last year, it became a rich and deep place to observe the holiday.  In addition, just the day before, one of the elderly canons (priests in a leadership role) at the Abbey had died. So, along with the rainy day, the soulful Abbey (full of tombs!), and the occasion of the death of the canon it really was a wonderful place to learn about All Souls Day, and about the depth of our Anglican Tradition - not merely by reading about it or talking about it, but by doing it.   I entered Westminster Abbey a tourist, and left a pilgrim.

I pray that we all take time today to reflect upon All Souls Day and pray for all those who have died, and pray for us, that we might live in a way that is full, abundant, and holy.

Blessings on All Souls Day,

~The Rev. Peter M.Carey










photo credit









photo credit