Monday, July 28, 2014

"Your mind will answer most questions if you learn to relax and wait for the answer." ~William S. Burroughs



"Your mind will answer most questions if you learn to relax and wait for the answer."
~William S. Burroughs


Individual commitment to a group effort



Individual commitment to a group effort - that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.

~Vince Lombardi

The kingdom of God



The kingdom of God is not something in the far future that is going suddenly to come down from heaven and settle on you and magically turn everything right. You yourselves are It. It’s in you and among you; you have to do It or It will never come.


posted in the Inward/Outward blog

No time to think?

This opinion piece in yesterday's New York Times, "No time to think," is essential reading for all of us who have issues with being "too busy," and who are tied up with our devices!


No Time to Think
Photo
CreditClayton Brothers
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
This story is included with an NYT Opinion subscription.
Learn more »
ONE of the biggest complaints in modern society is being overscheduled, overcommitted and overextended. Ask people at a social gathering how they are and the stock answer is “super busy,” “crazy busy” or “insanely busy.” Nobody is just “fine” anymore.
When people aren’t super busy at work, they are crazy busy exercising, entertaining or taking their kids to Chinese lessons. Or maybe they are insanely busy playing fantasy football, tracing their genealogy or churning their own butter.
And if there is ever a still moment for reflective thought — say, while waiting in line at the grocery store or sitting in traffic — out comes the mobile device. So it’s worth noting a study published last month in the journal Science, which shows how far people will go to avoid introspection.
“We had noted how wedded to our devices we all seem to be and that people seem to find any excuse they can to keep busy,” said Timothy Wilson, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia and lead author of the study.
READ IT ALL HERE

No time to think?

This opinion piece in yesterday's New York Times, "No time to think," is essential reading for all of us who have issues with being "too busy," and who are tied up with our devices!


No Time to Think



Photo

CreditClayton Brothers

Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Continue reading the main story
Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story

This story is included with an NYT Opinion subscription.
Learn more »
ONE of the biggest complaints in modern society is being overscheduled, overcommitted and overextended. Ask people at a social gathering how they are and the stock answer is “super busy,” “crazy busy” or “insanely busy.” Nobody is just “fine” anymore.
When people aren’t super busy at work, they are crazy busy exercising, entertaining or taking their kids to Chinese lessons. Or maybe they are insanely busy playing fantasy football, tracing their genealogy or churning their own butter.
And if there is ever a still moment for reflective thought — say, while waiting in line at the grocery store or sitting in traffic — out comes the mobile device. So it’s worth noting a study published last month in the journal Science, which shows how far people will go to avoid introspection.
“We had noted how wedded to our devices we all seem to be and that people seem to find any excuse they can to keep busy,” said Timothy Wilson, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia and lead author of the study.
READ IT ALL HERE

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Bill Walton on the Grateful Dead

The Grateful Dead, they're my best friends. Their message of hope, peace, love, teamwork, creativity, imagination, celebration, the dance, the vision, the purpose, the passion all of the things I believe in makes me the luckiest Deadhead in the world.

~Bill Walton

Psalm 26: "That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works."

Psalm 26: "That I may publish with the voice of thanksgiving, and tell of all thy wondrous works."

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Baseball With the Bishop, Rays Vs. Red Sox, Aug. 29



Baseball With the Bishop, Rays Vs. Red Sox, Aug. 29

By From Staff Reports
ST. PETERSBURG - Each year, the Diocese of Southwest Florida gathers for Baseball with the Bishop at Tropicana Field.
BaseballThis year, Baseball with the Bishop Night is set for Friday, Aug. 29. The price is $20 for a Lower Level Ticket, a $35 value. The first pitch is 7:10 p.m. Gates open at 5:10 p.m.
 
A portion of each ticket sold will benefi t the Episcopal Charities Fund of Southwest Florida. This is an excellent family event, and is open to friends and family of parishioners across the Diocese. Don’t forget to invite your youth group. The deadline to purchase is Wednesday, August 20.
 
For a flier to post at your parish or include in your bulletin, visit:
To order tickets or for more information, please contact Rays Representative Darcy Calhoun at 727-825-3293 or DCALHOUN@RAYSBASEBALL.COM.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Communion on the moon 45 years ago


45 Years ago humans stepped onto the moon.  Did you know that they also shared communion?

Pretty interesting blogpost from 5 years ago over at "Irenic Thoughts."  Check it out:

~Chaplain Carey


Communion on the Moon

Buzz Aldrin steps down to the surface of the moon
You will read and hear much today of what happened 40 years ago on July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong's "One small step for man" will be replayed again and again. But minutes after the lunar landing and prior to the moonwalk, Lunar Module pilot Buzz Aldrin radioed back to earth,
Houston, this is Eagle. This is the LM pilot speaking. I would like to request a few moments of silence. I would like to invite each person listening in, whoever or wherever he may be, to contemplate for a moment the events of the last few hours, and to give thanks in his own individual way.
Silence was all he could request. In his autobiography Aldrin would write, "NASA was already embroiled in a legal battle with Madelyn Murray O'Hare, the celebrated opponent of religion, over the Apollo 8 crew reading from Genesis while orbiting the moon at Christmas." A presbyterian layman, Aldrin arranged to take reserved sacrament (already blessed bread and wine) with him to the moon. He had a Ph.D. in astrophysics from MIT, and he was a man smart enough to think of no better way to offer thanks for the moon landing. He had permission to bring the sacrament on board as long as he didn't talk of it for two decades. He would later write,
In the radio blackout, I opened the little plastic packages which contained the bread and the wine. I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me. Buzz Aldrin on the moonIn the one-sixth gravity of the moon, the wine slowly curled and gracefully came up the side of the cup. Then I read the Scripture, "I am the vine, you are the branches. Whosoever abides in me will bring forth much fruit....Eagle's metal body creaked. I ate the tiny Host and swallowed the wine. I gave thanks for the intelligence and spirit that had brought two young pilots to the Sea of Tranquility. It was interesting for me to think: the very first liquid ever poured on the moon, and the very first food eaten there, were the communion elements.
This day marks the 40th anniversary of that communion on the moon. The following prayer for space travel is appropriate for this day:
Creator of the universe, whose dominion extends through the immensity of space: guide and guard those who seek to fathom its mysteries. Save us from arrogance lest we forget that our achievements are grounded in thee, and, by the grace of thy Holy Spirit, protect our travels beyond the reaches of earth, that we may glory ever more in the wonder of thy creation: through Jesus Christ, thy Word, by whom all things came to be, who with thee and the Holy Spirit liveth and reigneth, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Communion on the moon 45 years ago


45 Years ago humans stepped onto the moon.  Did you know that they also shared communion?

Pretty interesting blogpost from 5 years ago over at "Irenic Thoughts."  Check it out:

~Chaplain Carey


Communion on the Moon

Buzz Aldrin steps down to the surface of the moon
You will read and hear much today of what happened 40 years ago on July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong's "One small step for man" will be replayed again and again. But minutes after the lunar landing and prior to the moonwalk, Lunar Module pilot Buzz Aldrin radioed back to earth,
Houston, this is Eagle. This is the LM pilot speaking. I would like to request a few moments of silence. I would like to invite each person listening in, whoever or wherever he may be, to contemplate for a moment the events of the last few hours, and to give thanks in his own individual way.
Silence was all he could request. In his autobiography Aldrin would write, "NASA was already embroiled in a legal battle with Madelyn Murray O'Hare, the celebrated opponent of religion, over the Apollo 8 crew reading from Genesis while orbiting the moon at Christmas." A presbyterian layman, Aldrin arranged to take reserved sacrament (already blessed bread and wine) with him to the moon. He had a Ph.D. in astrophysics from MIT, and he was a man smart enough to think of no better way to offer thanks for the moon landing. He had permission to bring the sacrament on board as long as he didn't talk of it for two decades. He would later write,
In the radio blackout, I opened the little plastic packages which contained the bread and the wine. I poured the wine into the chalice our church had given me. Buzz Aldrin on the moonIn the one-sixth gravity of the moon, the wine slowly curled and gracefully came up the side of the cup. Then I read the Scripture, "I am the vine, you are the branches. Whosoever abides in me will bring forth much fruit....Eagle's metal body creaked. I ate the tiny Host and swallowed the wine. I gave thanks for the intelligence and spirit that had brought two young pilots to the Sea of Tranquility. It was interesting for me to think: the very first liquid ever poured on the moon, and the very first food eaten there, were the communion elements.
This day marks the 40th anniversary of that communion on the moon. The following prayer for space travel is appropriate for this day:
Creator of the universe, whose dominion extends through the immensity of space: guide and guard those who seek to fathom its mysteries. Save us from arrogance lest we forget that our achievements are grounded in thee, and, by the grace of thy Holy Spirit, protect our travels beyond the reaches of earth, that we may glory ever more in the wonder of thy creation: through Jesus Christ, thy Word, by whom all things came to be, who with thee and the Holy Spirit liveth and reigneth, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

If you don't love what you do, you won't do it with much conviction or passion. Mia Hamm


If you don't love what you do, you won't do it with much conviction or passion.

~Mia Hamm

Saturday, July 19, 2014

an experience of being alive




"People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive ... Experience of life. The mind has to do with meaning. What’s the meaning of a flower? ... There’s no meaning. What’s the meaning of a flea? It’s just there. That’s it. And your own meaning is that you’re there."

-- Joseph Campbell and The Power of Myth (with Bill Moyers) pp. 4,5 (small paperback edition)

an experience of being alive




"People say that what we’re all seeking is a meaning for life. I don’t think that’s what we’re really seeking. I think that what we’re seeking is an experience of being alive, so that our experiences on the purely physical plane will have resonances with our own innermost being and reality, so that we actually feel the rapture of being alive ... Experience of life. The mind has to do with meaning. What’s the meaning of a flower? ... There’s no meaning. What’s the meaning of a flea? It’s just there. That’s it. And your own meaning is that you’re there."

-- Joseph Campbell and The Power of Myth (with Bill Moyers) pp. 4,5 (small paperback edition)

Rowan Williams on the Jesus Prayer ...

Rowan Williams Promoting the Jesus Prayer as Answer to Modern Angst
Jul 192014  7 Comment(s)  Tags: er
Dr. Rowan Williams, who recently retired as Archbishop of Canterbury, was one of a group asked by the New Statesman to respond to the topic, “After God: How do we fill the faith-shaped hole in modern life?” Here is his response.

The physicality of prayer

Rowan Williams
The Christianity I was originally formed in was not very ritual-minded: it was both intellectually alert and emotionally intense – the best of a style of Welsh Nonconformity now almost extinct – but tended to look down on physical expression of belief (other than singing, which I suspect was regarded as not really physical). Only when the family joined the Anglican Church when I was in my early teens, after we’d moved to another town, did I discover a sense of worship as a physical art, involving gesture, movement and colour. I still have a vivid memory of my first experience of a solemn Mass with procession at Easter, when I was, I suppose, about 12 – the awareness of a deliberate strategy of involving the senses at many levels.
The mild High Church atmosphere of those years was, for me, an environment that made strong imaginative and emotional sense, and indeed is still the kind of setting where I feel most instinctively at home, rather than in more simply word-oriented styles, or in the heated atmosphere of “charismatic” worship, repetitive song and unstructured prayer – although I’ve learned to be nourished by that, too, in many circumstances. But the ritual that is most significant for me apart from the routines of public worship and the daily recitation of the fixed words of morning and evening prayer owes more to non-Anglican sources.
Readers of Salinger’s Franny and Zooey will recall the somewhat unexpected appearance there of an account of the traditional Greek and Russian discipline of meditative repetition of the “Jesus Prayer” (“Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy upon me, a sinner”). Practically every Eastern Orthodox writer on prayer will describe this, and many in the tradition also describe some of the physical disciplines that may be used to support it – being aware of your breathing, sitting in a certain way, focusing attention on your chest: “bringing the mind into the heart”, as the books characterise it.
The interest in uniting words with posture and breath is, of course, typical of non-Christian practices also; and over the years increasing exposure to and engagement with the Buddhist world in particular has made me aware of practices not unlike the “Jesus Prayer” and introduced me to disciplines that further enforce the stillness and physical focus that the prayer entails. Walking meditation, pacing very slowly and co-ordinating each step with an out-breath, is something I have found increasingly important as a preparation for a longer time of silence.
So: the regular ritual to begin the day when I’m in the house is a matter of an early rise and a brief walking meditation or sometimes a few slow prostrations, before squatting for 30 or 40 minutes (a low stool to support the thighs and reduce the weight on the lower legs) with the “Jesus Prayer”: repeating (usually silently) the words as I breathe out, leaving a moment between repetitions to notice the beating of the heart, which will slow down steadily over the period.
The prayer isn’t any kind of magical invo­cation or auto-suggestion – simply a vehicle to detach you slowly from distracted, wandering images and thoughts. These will happen, but you simply go on repeating the words and gently bringing attention back to them. If it is proceeding as it should, there is something like an indistinct picture or sensation of the inside of the body as a sort of hollow, a cave, in which breath comes and goes, with an underlying pulse. If you want to speak theologically about it, it’s a time when you are aware of your body as simply a place where life happens and where, therefore, God “happens”: a life lived in you.
So the day begins with a physically concrete and specific reminder that your own individual existence is breathed through by a life that isn’t your possession; and at moments of tension or anxiety during the day, deliberately breathing in and out a few times with the words of the prayer in mind connects you with this life that isn’t yours, immersing the anxiety and dispersing the tension – even if it doesn’t simply take away pain or doubt, solve problems or create some kind of spiritual bliss. The point is just to be connected again.
The mature practitioner (not me) will discover a steady clarity in the vision of self and world, and, in “advanced” states, an awareness of unbroken inner light, with the strong sense of an action going on within that is quite independent of your individual will – the prayer “praying itself”, not just human words but a connection between God transcendent and God present and within. Ritual anchors, ritual aligns, harmonises, relates. And what happens in the “Jesus Prayer” is just the way an individual can make real what is constantly going on in the larger-scale worship of the sacraments. The pity is that a lot of western Christianity these days finds all this increasingly alien. But I don’t think any one of us can begin to discover again what religion might mean unless we are prepared to expose ourselves to new ways of being in our bodies. But that’s a long story.
__________________________________________
Posted by the Orthodox Christian Network.  You can find the Orthodox Christian Network on Google+.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

May the road rise up to meet you



May the road rise up to meet you.
May the wind always be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
and rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the palm of His hand.

Sunday, July 06, 2014

Everything I do is part of my passion

Everything I do is part of my passion. I do the things I like to do. It's sort of a bigger version of having more than one hobby. I love to play piano, sing, and act. I love to do all those things.

~Harry Connick, Jr.

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

Nice news article from the Diocese of Southwest Florida on my new call at Berkeley Prep


Carey Named New Chaplain at Tampa's Berkeley Prep

By From Staff Reports
TAMPA - The Rev. Peter Michael Carey was named Berkeley Preparatory School chaplain, beginning July 1, 2014. He is replacing the Rev. Doug Carter, the current Berkeley chaplain of 14 years.
The Rev. Carey will be leaving St. Paul’s Memorial Church in Charlottesville, Va., where he has served as senior associate rector since 2012. Prior to that appointment, he served as associate rector of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Va., and was also the school chaplain at St. Catherine’s Episcopal School in Richmond, Va.
Carey earned a bachelor's in political science from Bates College in 1991, and a master’s from George Washington University in secondary education; he then embarked on an independent school teaching career that took him to Durham Academy and The Episcopal Academy where he taught a variety of history and religion courses.
In 2004, he attended Virginia Theological Seminary, earning a Master of Divinity degree and Cum Laude honors. The Rev. Carey has served on several non-profit boards, has earned numerous awards, and has presented at multiple national conferences.
"During the search process, it became clear that he has a deep and abiding passion for students and great schools, and he is thrilled to be returning to a school setting as Chaplain," said HeadmasterJoseph W. Seivold in a letter to the Berkeley Prep community. "The Careys are ecstatic to be joining our school, and I know that our partnership in the years to come will provide great benefits to all within the Berkeley family, which now includes them."