Friday, May 29, 2015

From LaxMagazine: Thompson, Cummings Earn Second-Straight Tewaaraton Awards

Thompson, Cummings Earn Second-Straight Tewaaraton Awards
from press release
WASHINGTON, May 28, 2015 – The Tewaaraton Foundation has announced University at Albany attackman Lyle Thompson and University of Maryland midfielder Taylor Cummings as the winners of the 15th annual Tewaaraton Award, presented by Under Armour. The Tewaaraton Award annually honors the top male and top female college lacrosse players in the United States.
A finalist for the third consecutive year, Albany's Lyle Thompson is the first men's repeat winner in the history of the Tewaaraton Award. The senior attackman from Onondaga Nation, N.Y., who last year shared the Tewaaraton with brother Miles in 2014, led Albany's top-ranked offense to the America East regular season and Tournament titles, earning his third consecutive conference Player of the Year award and Most Outstanding Player of the America East Tournament. Thompson led NCAA Division I with 6.37 points per game, 121 points and 69 assists.
Thompson's 121 points were second best in NCAA history, trailing only his own mark of 128 points set in 2014. He was named to the USILA All-America first team for the third time and earned the USILA's Lt. Raymond J. Enners Award as the nation's most outstanding player for a second consecutive season. On April 14, he passed 2013 Tewaaraton winner Rob Pannell (354 points) as the all-time leading scorer in NCAA Division I men's lacrosse, and he ended his career with exactly 400 points. Lyle is the third winner from the America East Conference, also including Doug Shanahan (Hofstra, 2001).
The five men's finalists were University of Denver attackman Wesley Berg, Duke University midfielder Myles Jones, University of Notre Dame attackman Matt Kavanagh, Syracuse University attackman Kevin Rice, and Thompson.

Lyle Thompson's acrobatic plays and preternatural feeding ability made him a three-time finalist for the award, and its first two-time winner. His 400 points and 225 assists are career NCAA marks for DI men's lacrosse, and his final two seasons stand as the two top point performances in single-season history. (Rich Barnes)

Reigning Tewaaraton winner and NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player Taylor Cummings helped Maryland capture a second consecutive national championship, leading the Terrapins with 100 points, 37 assists, 41 ground balls, 143 draw controls and 35 caused turnovers. The junior from Ellicott City, Md., earned the Big Ten Midfielder of the Year award and was named all-conference for a third time as the Terrapins earned the top seed in the NCAA tournament. She also was named to the IWLCA All-America first team for the third time. Cummings' per game averages for points, ground balls, draw controls and caused turnovers were tops in the Big Ten, and she ranked first in the nation in points and fifth in draw controls.
 

A do-everything midfielder for Maryland, Taylor Cummings is the fourth player to win back-to-back Tewaaraton Awards, and is the fifth Maryland winner in the past six seasons. (John Strohsacker)

Cummings is one of four players to win the Tewaaraton Award in consecutive seasons, joining Kristen Kjellman (2006, 2007), Hannah Nielsen (2008, 2009) and Katie Schwarzmann (2012, 2013). She is Maryland's sixth Tewaaraton winner, joining Jen Adams (2001), Caitlyn McFadden (2010), Schwarzmann (2012, 2013), and is the first winner from the Big Ten Conference. Maryland players have won five of the last six women's Tewaaraton Awards.

Read the rest HERE at LaxMagazine

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Recommended summer reading for educators from NAIS



Summer is a time to relax and rejuvenate after a busy school year. It is also a time to catch up on the latest must-reads. Below is a list of recommended books that were discussed in the NAIS Connect community by your independent school colleagues.
  1. Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools
    By Michael Horn and Heather Staker
  2. Blueprint for TomorrowBy Prakash Nair
  3. Boxers and SaintsBy Gene Luen Yang
  4. Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young Men 
    By Leonard Sax
  5. Creative Confidence 
    By Tom and David Kelly
  6. Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World 
    By Tony Wagner
  7. Crucial Conversations 
    By Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, and Switzler
  8. Education and Democracy in the 21st Century
    By Nel Noddings
  9. The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don't Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need -- and What We Can Do About It
    By Tony Wagner
  10. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character 
    By Paul Tough
  11. It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens
    By Danah Boyd
  12. Making Thinking Visible 
    By Ron Ritchhart
  13. A More Beautiful Question
    By Warren Berger
  14. On Your Mark: Challenging the Conventions of Grading and Reporting 
    By Thomas R. Guskey
  15. Raving Fans 
    By Kenneth Blanchard
  16. The Smart Culture
    By Robert Hayman
  17. What It Is 
    By Lynda Barry
You can find these titles at bookstores and on Amazon.com. Also check out NAIS books in the NAIS Bookstore.
Article Date: 5/27/2015

Trust in the slow work of God



Above all, trust in the slow work of God.
We are quite naturally impatient in everything to reach the end without delay.
We should like to skip the intermediate stages.
We are impatient of being on the way to something unknown, something new.
And yet it is the law of all progress that it is made by passing through some stages of instability—and that it may take a very long time.

And so I think it is with you.
Your ideas mature gradually–let them grow,
Let them shape themselves, without undue haste.
Don’t try to force them on,
as though you could be today what time
(that is to say, grace and circumstances acting on your own good will)
will make of you tomorrow.

Only God could say what this new spirit gradually forming within you will be.
Give our Lord the benefit of believing that his hand is leading you,
and accept the anxiety of feeling yourself in suspense and incomplete.

~Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, SJ

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

50

We cannot do great things; we can only do small things with great love. Mother Teresa

What is to give light must endure burning.  Viktor Frankl

Prayer is unlimited mind.

Everything includes its opposite.

how we say no matters more than whether we say no

the way through the world is more difficult to find than the way beyond it.  Wallace Stevens

Many answer, but few are called.

Sometimes I go about pitying about myself and all along my soul is being blown by great wind across the sky. Ojibway

Depression is the despair of not being true to oneself. Kierkegaard

In my end is my beginning.  TS. Eliot

For the garden is the only place there is
But you will not find it
until you have looked for it everywhere
and found nowhere that is not a desert.
W.H. Auden

If your mind is too open your brains could fall out.

Love all the earth, every ray of God's light, every grain of sand or blade of grass, every living thing.  if you love the earth enough, you will know the divine mystery.
Dostoevski

We can only live our lives one day at a time. JBC

If you bring forth what is inside you, what you bring forth will save you.
Gospel of St. Thomas

God is subtle, but not malicious.
Einstein

To be free is to be intimate with all things. Jack Kornfield

Who can tell the dancer from the dance.  Yeats

God, like an oracle neither declares nor hides, but sets forth by signs. Heraclitus

True wholeness is achieved by blending with life.  Tao

God is the partner of your most intimate soliloquies. V Frankl

You have to learn to see what you're looking at, and then to say what you see. Joan Chitester

God is hiding in the world. Our task is to let the divine emerge from our deeds.  Abraham Heschel

Nothing that is urgent is important.  Nothing that is important is urgent.  Zen Saying

Prayer is unlimited mind.

The soul is here for its own joy.  Rumi

If we lose anything, it is hidden nearby.  Ryokan

Pray without ceasing.

God help us to live slowly; to move simply; to look softly; to allow emptiness to let the heart create for us.  Amen

There is nothing so much like God in all the world as silence.  Meister Eckhart

Thursday, May 21, 2015

College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

In the endless stream of advice we offer our teens, it is far too easy to fall back on clichés, well-worn turns of phrase or unquestioned ideas that contain only a shred of truth. Sometimes when I am heaping these meaningless, or worse, harmful, words on my kids I stop and think, is this really true or have I just heard it so many times I have come to accept it as truth? Here are a few of the aphorisms I have at one time or another offered up and why, instead, I owed my kids the truth.
College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

Eight Lies Parents Tell Teens:

1. College is the best four years of your life. College may be three and a half, or three or two of the best years of your life, or it may not. College requires a period of adjustment. Moving to a place where you know almost no one and there are few true friends is not a recipe for instant happiness. Freshman find themselves lost or homesick and all of that is normal. What isn’t normal is thinking you will wake up your first morning at university and all will be great. But when we tell them that there are four years of fun in store, and it turns out not to be strictly true, pain, disappointment and a feeling of “what is wrong with me” can follow. One of my kids described college as a time of high highs and low lows and that may be just about right. Today, as a mom, I would have a hard time arguing that the best years of my life came before my children existed.
2. You need to find your passion. If you find a passion in high school or college, that is a wonderful and fortunate thing. But you may not find it there, or any where and that will not stand in the way of having a happy, productive, caring and successful life. Do not sweat this one, it may be one of the biggest lies we tell our children and ourselves. When we feed our kids this lie we send them to chase something they may never find.
3. Keep all your options open. I am guilty of this one, of telling my kids to commit to nothing and try not to close any doors. Life isn’t lived by standing in hallways, immobilized by indecision, but rather by bursting through those doors, jumping at an opportunity and, if it fails, regrouping and trying again.
Read the rest HERE at grownandflown.com

College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

In the endless stream of advice we offer our teens, it is far too easy to fall back on clichés, well-worn turns of phrase or unquestioned ideas that contain only a shred of truth. Sometimes when I am heaping these meaningless, or worse, harmful, words on my kids I stop and think, is this really true or have I just heard it so many times I have come to accept it as truth? Here are a few of the aphorisms I have at one time or another offered up and why, instead, I owed my kids the truth.
College is the Best Four Years of Your Life and Other Lies Parents Tell Teens

Eight Lies Parents Tell Teens:

1. College is the best four years of your life. College may be three and a half, or three or two of the best years of your life, or it may not. College requires a period of adjustment. Moving to a place where you know almost no one and there are few true friends is not a recipe for instant happiness. Freshman find themselves lost or homesick and all of that is normal. What isn’t normal is thinking you will wake up your first morning at university and all will be great. But when we tell them that there are four years of fun in store, and it turns out not to be strictly true, pain, disappointment and a feeling of “what is wrong with me” can follow. One of my kids described college as a time of high highs and low lows and that may be just about right. Today, as a mom, I would have a hard time arguing that the best years of my life came before my children existed.
2. You need to find your passion. If you find a passion in high school or college, that is a wonderful and fortunate thing. But you may not find it there, or any where and that will not stand in the way of having a happy, productive, caring and successful life. Do not sweat this one, it may be one of the biggest lies we tell our children and ourselves. When we feed our kids this lie we send them to chase something they may never find.
3. Keep all your options open. I am guilty of this one, of telling my kids to commit to nothing and try not to close any doors. Life isn’t lived by standing in hallways, immobilized by indecision, but rather by bursting through those doors, jumping at an opportunity and, if it fails, regrouping and trying again.
Read the rest HERE at grownandflown.com

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School


Most schools across the nation have marked the end of another academic year, and it’s time for summer. Time for kids to bolt for the schoolhouse doors for two long months of play, to explore their neighborhoods and discover the mysteries, treasures, and dramas they have to offer. This childhood idyll will hold true for some children, but for many kids, the coming of summer signals little more than a seasonal shift from one set of scheduled, adult-supervised lessons and activities to another.

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreamingrisk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

Read it all HERE at The Atlantic

Why Free Play Is the Best Summer School


Most schools across the nation have marked the end of another academic year, and it’s time for summer. Time for kids to bolt for the schoolhouse doors for two long months of play, to explore their neighborhoods and discover the mysteries, treasures, and dramas they have to offer. This childhood idyll will hold true for some children, but for many kids, the coming of summer signals little more than a seasonal shift from one set of scheduled, adult-supervised lessons and activities to another.

Unscheduled, unsupervised, playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. The value of free play,  daydreamingrisk-taking, and independent discovery have been much in the news this year, and a new study by psychologists at the University of Colorado reveals just how important these activities are in the development of children’s executive functioning.

Read it all HERE at The Atlantic

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

11 Ways that Garcelon Field is the Bates Place to Be

11 ways that Garcelon Field is the Bates place to be

The $2.6 million donor-funded renovation to Garcelon Field in 2010 has led to a lot of good things for Bates over the last five years, including tonight’s first-round NCAA men’s lacrosse game between Bates and Keene State at 7 p.m.
An aerial photograph of Garcelon Field taken during the Bates vs. Wesleyan football game on Oct. 11, 2014. (Lincoln Benedict '09)
That Garcelon is at a campus crossroads (Commons and Ladd Library to the south, residences to the north, academic buildings to the west, and other athletic facilities to the east) is apparent in this aerial photograph during the Bates vs. Wesleyan football game on Oct. 11, 2014. (Lincoln Benedict ’09)
The 2010 renovation featured a new FieldTurf surface; an aluminum grandstand for 1,500 fans including stadium seats in the center section; a larger press box; and four Musco light towers for nighttime play.
Today’s game is the first playoff contest ever played on the field since it was built in 1899 and named for a leading Lewiston and Maine citizen, Alonzo Garcelon.
Bates football was Garcelon’s only tenant for much of its history, and like its NESCAC counterparts, football does not play in the post-season. But with the 2010 renovation, and the lacrosse program’s move to Garcelon Field, the door was open for the field’s debut tonight as an NCAA post-season venue.
During dedication ceremonies in 2010, PA announcer Luke Wamboldt ’11 said the renovation was “an improvement not just for Bates athletics, but for Bates College.”
In that spirit, here are 11 ways that Garcelon is the Bates place to be.

1. A Place Where It’s a Great Day to Be a Bobcat

Made possible by Bates donors, dedication day in 2010 was a happy day that set the tone for an invigorated Bates place.

2. A Place for New Traditions

The Class of 2012 used Garcelon Field to begin a new Commencement tradition. Rather than the Historic Quad for their class photo, they chose Garcelon. And for the first time, the class formed their class numerals, as shown in this time-lapse video by Josh Ajamu ’14.

3. A Place for New Friends

Every game played on Garcelon Field offers a chance for a new Bates connection. Here, Paul Perry ’57, who played on the Bates football team that won the old Maine State Series title in 1956, greets Brendan Murphy ’11 as the Bobcats head onto the field for their Homecoming game vs. Colby in 2010. (H. Lincoln Benedict ’09)
Paul Perry '57, a member of the 1956 Maine State Series champion football team, greets Brendan Murphy '11 as the Bobcat football team heads onto the field for its Homecoming game vs. Colby in 2010. (H. Lincoln Benedict '09)
Paul Perry ’57, a member of the 1956 Maine State Series champion football team, greets Brendan Murphy ’11 as the Bobcat football team heads onto the field for its Homecoming game vs. Colby in 2010. (H. Lincoln Benedict ’09)

4. A Place to Have a Ball

The official stat sheet says the Bates baseball team makes its outside debut in February,down South or out West. But it can “begin” much earlier, like January.
“It’s unbelievably warm,” said Sam Maliska ’15, a righthanded pitcher from Palo Alto, Calif., as he and others threw the ball around on a rare warm day in January 2014. “I love being out here with the boys,” said Maliska, standing third from left in the photo below.
Last year’s January prelude culminated in the team’s first-ever appearance in the NESCAC Championships in May. This spring, the team has again made it to the NESCAC tournament.
140115_Winter_Baseball_0082
Varsity pitcher Sam Maliska ’15 (third from left), a psychology major from Palo Alto, Calif., pauses with teammates during an informal practice on Garcelon Field. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

5. A Place to Remember

After Bates student John Durkin ’14 died while studying in Rome in February 2014, his family and friends established the John Nolen Durkin Fund at the college.
In May 2014, his Bates friends held a benefit softball game at Garcelon Field, raising more than $2,000 for the fund. The second annual fundraiser is scheduled for May 16.
Blair Shrewsbury ‘14 pitches in the 1st annual John Durkin One Swing Softball Tournament on May 17, 2014, on Garcelon Field. Wally Pierce ‘14 looks on, at back. Over 2,000 was raised for the John Nolen Durkin Scholarship Fund. (Sarah Crosby/Bates College)
Blair Shrewsbury ’14 pitches in the John Durkin One Swing Softball Tournament on May 17, 2014, on Garcelon Field. Wally Pierce ’14 looks on, at back. Over $2,000 was raised for the John Nolen Durkin Scholarship Fund. (Sarah Crosby/Bates College)

6. A Place Where ‘Victory’s at Our Door’

The renovation of Garcelon has coincided with an upswing in the football team’s success.
In 2014, the Bobcats concluded their best four-year stretch since 1982. And that’s something to shout about!

 7. A Place Where The Games Go On

Careful plowing by Bates Facility Services helps to keep Garcelon Field snow-free during the winter semester so anyone can relish a bit of green space and dry ground — even if the “green” is polyethylene fibers and the “ground” is silica sand and rounded bits of cryogenic rubber!
And even if there’s a bit of snow in the air, the games go on.
Seemingly oblivious to the early April snow, ultimate frisbee players practice on Garcelon Field. (Josh Kuckens/Bates College)
Seemingly oblivious to the early April snow, ultimate frisbee players practice on Garcelon Field in 2015. (Josh Kuckens/Bates College)

8. A Place that Makes a Great Impression

You have one chance to make a first impression — that could be a mantra of Admission tour guides, who know that a campus tour makes a powerful statement about a college’s attractiveness and value. No wonder that our tour guides lead their groups from the Residential Village to Commons by way of Garcelon Field.
An Admission tour guide leads a group of future students and parents on a tour of campus, passing by Garcelon Field on their way to Commons. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)
An Admission tour guide leads a group of future students and parents on a tour of campus, passing Garcelon Field on their way to Commons. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

9. A Place To Chill Out

FieldTurf tends to absorb more solar radiation than grass, so Bates students know where to go for a cozy and warm microclimate on a spring day.

Bates students enjoy a beautiful 70 degree Monday to start finals week.


10. A Place to Take Time

Students of geology professor Mike Retelle took to Garcelon on a cold January 2014 morning to demonstrate visually how long it took for life to appear on Earth after the planet formed 4.6 billion years ago.
The idea was to use the 100-yard length of Garcelon Field to create a geologic time line. At one end, a group of students represented the earliest geologic processes, some 3.93 billion years ago.
Then there was a long gap, 70 yards or 3.3 billion years, to the next group of students way down by  the other end zone. They represented the relatively recent appearance of life, 600 million years ago.
At the 1 yard line, or 55 million years ago, a student represented the first primates.
“It’s crazy to see. Everything happens inside the 15-yard line,” explained Luke Combs ’15, an economics major and football player.

The depth of geologic history is evident: a few students stand at the beginning of Earth’s history at far left, then a long time goes by before the emergence of life, far right. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

11. A Place Where Things Are Looking Up

During a men’s lacrosse game vs. Bowdoin at Garcelon Field on April 2, 2014, fans who looked up from the action saw a line of Canada geese heading north for the summer.
web_140402_MLAX_Bowdoin_0255
(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

15 words to eliminate from your vocabulary to sound smarter

15 words to eliminate from your vocabulary to sound smarter

Law School Students in the Classroom 2011www.giving.sc.eduStop modifying adjectives with the word "really."
Newsprint is on life support, emojis are multiplying faster than hungry Gremlins, and 300 million people worldwide strive to make their point in 140 or fewer characters.
People don't have the time or the attention span to read any more words than necessary.
You want your readers to hear you out, understand your message, and perhaps be entertained, right? Here's a list of words to eliminate to help you write more succinctly. 

1. That

It's superfluous most of the time. Open any document you've got drafted on your desktop, and find a sentence with that in it. Read it out loud. Now read it again without that. If the sentence works without it, delete it. Also? Don't use that when you refer to people. "I have several friends that live in the neighborhood." No. No, you don't. You have friends who. Not friends that.

2. Went

went to school. Or the store, or to church, or to a conference, to Vegas, wherever it is you're inclined to go. Instead of went, consider drove, skated, walked, ran, flew. There are any number of ways to move from here to there. Pick one. Don't be lazy and miss the chance to add to your story. 

3. Honestly

People use honestly to add emphasis. The problem is, the minute you tell your reader this particular statement is honest, you've implied the rest of your words were not. #Awkward

4. Absolutely

Adding this word to most sentences is redundant. Something is either necessary, or it isn't. Absolutely necessary doesn't make it more necessary. If you recommend an essential course to your new employees, it's essential. Coincidentally, the definition of essential is absolutely necessary. Chicken or egg, eh?

5. Very

Accurate adjectives don't need qualifiers. If you need to qualify it? Replace it. Very is intended to magnify a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. What it does is makes your statement less specific. If you're very happy? Be ecstatic. If you're very sad, perhaps you're melancholy or depressed. Woebegone, even. Very sad is a lazy way of making your point. Another pitfall of using very as a modifier? It's subjective. Very cold and very tall mean different things to different people. Be specific. She's 6'3" and it's 13 degrees below freezing? These make your story better while also ensuring the reader understands the point you're making.

6. Really

Unless you're a Valley Girl, visiting from 1985, there's no need to use really to modify an adjective. Or a verb. Or an adverb. Pick a different word to make your point. And never repeat really, or very for that matter. That's really, really bad writing.
If you are visiting from 1985? Please bring the birth certificate for my Cabbage Patch Doll on your next visit. Thanks. 

7. Amazing

The word means "causing great surprise or sudden wonder." It's synonymous with wonderful, incredible, startling, marvelous, astonishing, astounding, remarkable, miraculous, surprising, mind-blowing, and staggering. You get the point, right? It's everywhere. It's in corporate slogans. It dominated the Academy Awards acceptance speeches. It's all over social media. It's discussed in pre-game shows and post-game shows.
Newsflash: If everything is amazing, nothing is. 

8. Always

Absolutes lock the writer into a position, sound conceited and close-minded, and often open the door to criticism regarding inaccuracies. Always is rarely true. Unless you're giving written commands or instruction, find another word.

9. Never

See: Always.

10. Literally

Literally means literal. Actually happening as stated. Without exaggeration. More often than not, when the term is used, the writer means figuratively. Whatever is happening is being described metaphorically. No one actually "waits on pins and needles." How uncomfortable would that be?

11. Just

It's a filler word and it makes your sentence weaker, not stronger. Unless you're using it as a synonym for equitable, fair, even-handed, or impartial, don't use it at all. 

12. Maybe

This makes you sound uninformed, unsure of the facts you're presenting. Regardless of the topic, do the legwork, be sure, write an informed piece. The only thing you communicate when you include these words is uncertainty.

13. Stuff

This word is casual, generic even. It serves as a placeholder for something better. If the details of the stuff aren't important enough to be included in the piece? Don't reference it at all. If you tell your reader to take your course because they'll learn a lot of stuff? They're likely to tell you to stuff it.

14. Things

See: Stuff.

15. Irregardless

This doesn't mean what you think it means, Jefe. It means regardless. It is literally (see what I did there?) defined as: regardless. Don't use it. Save yourself the embarrassment.
Whether you're ghostwriting for your CEO, updating a blog, selling a product, or finishing your master's thesis, you need to keep your reader engaged. These 15 words are a great place to start trimming the fat from your prose. Bonus? You'll sound smarter.


Read more: https://www.themuse.com/advice/15-words-you-need-to-eliminate-from-your-vocabulary-to-sound-smarter#ixzz3ZPGZqPyD

Friday, May 01, 2015

Berkeley Prep alum Nelson Agholor picked by Eagles in First Round

Nelson Agholor becomes first Berkeley Prep player in NFL, picked by Eagles at No. 20

Nelson Agholor is coming to Philadelphia instead of Marcus Mariota.
The Eagles selected the USC wide receiver with the 20th pick in the NFL draft Thursday night after months of speculation they would trade up to get Mariota.
But Chip Kelly stayed put because the price to move 18 spots to land his former Oregon quarterback was too steep. Mariota, the Heisman Trophy winner, went to Tennessee at No. 2.
Agholor is the first wide receiver picked in the first round by the Eagles since Jeremy Maclin in 2009. Coincidentally, the 6-foot-1, 190-pound wideout will help replace Maclin, a Pro Bowl pick last year who departed in free agency.
The Eagles have lost Pro Bowl wide receivers in consecutive years. They released three-time Pro Bowl wide receiver DeSean Jackson after a career year with Kelly in 2013.
Agholor had 104 receptions for 1,313 yards and 12 touchdowns last season. He also returned two punts for TDs. Agholor finished his career with 179 catches for 2,571 yards and 20 TDs. He averaged 14.6 yards per punt return with four TDs.
It's been a whirlwind offseason for the Eagles after they went 10-6 for the second straight year. Kelly traded Nick Foles and LeSean McCoy and released several veterans. He signed free-agent running backs DeMarco Murray and Ryan Mathews and acquired Sam Bradford and Kiko Alonso.