Tuesday, January 26, 2016

God's call



God’s call is mysterious; it comes in the darkness of faith. It is so fine, so subtle, that it is only with the deepest silence within us that we can hear it. And yet nothing is so decisive and overpowering for a human on this earth, nothing surer or stronger. This call is uninterrupted: God is always calling us.



(Posted in "Inside/Outside" Blog)

Monday, January 18, 2016

We bless your name, O God, for Martin Luther King, Jr.



We bless your name, O God, for Martin Luther King, Jr., and all that he did for people all over the world.  We pray for men and women everywhere who, like Dr. King, raise their voices against oppression and injustice and work nonviolently for justice and peace.  Help us in our time to stand against evil, to hear the voice of dissent, to respect the rights of all.  Give us convictions if we can't find them for ourselves, and the courage to speak out and act.  Out of the many voices of the oppressed may the clear voice of your people be heard.  We pray through Jesus of Nazareth, who with Dr. King, gave his life for the sake of the Dominion of God.  Amen.

from "Cycle of Prayer for Episcopal Schools" from the National Association of Episcopal Schools

Friday, January 15, 2016

The very love of God reaching out to us all


The very love of God reaching out to us all!


Bishop Michael Curry: We are a "House of Prayer for All People"



From Presiding Bishop Curry:
“Many of us have committed ourselves and our church to being ‘a house of prayer for all people,’ as the Bible says, when all are truly welcome,” Curry said in remarks he later made available to Episcopal News Service.

“Our commitment to be an inclusive church is not based on a social theory or capitulation to the ways of the culture, but on our belief that the outstretched arms of Jesus on the cross are a sign of the very love of God reaching out to us all. While I understand that many disagree with us, our decision regarding marriage is based on the belief that the words of the Apostle Paul to the Galatians are true for the church today: All who have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is no longer Jew or Gentile, slave or free, male or female, for all are one in Christ.”

“For so many who are committed to following Jesus in the way of love and being a church that lives that love, this decision will bring real pain,” he said. “For fellow disciples of Jesus in our church who are gay or lesbian, this will bring more pain. For many who have felt and been rejected by the church because of who they are, for many who have felt and been rejected by families and communities, our church opening itself in love was a sign of hope. And this will add pain on top of pain.”

Curry told the primates that he was in no sense comparing his own pain to theirs, but “I stand before you as your brother. I stand before you as a descendant of African slaves, stolen from their native land, enslaved in a bitter bondage, and then even after emancipation, segregated and excluded in church and society. And this conjures that up again, and brings pain.

“The pain for many will be real. But God is greater than anything. I love Jesus and I love the church. I am a Christian in the Anglican way. And like you, as we have said in this meeting, I am committed to ‘walking together’ with you as fellow primates in the Anglican family.”

From Presiding Bishop Curry, we are "a house of prayer for all people"



From Presiding Bishop Curry:
“Many of us have committed ourselves and our church to being ‘a house of prayer for all people,’ as the Bible says, when all are truly welcome,” Curry said in remarks he later made available to Episcopal News Service.

“Our commitment to be an inclusive church is not based on a social theory or capitulation to the ways of the culture, but on our belief that the outstretched arms of Jesus on the cross are a sign of the very love of God reaching out to us all. While I understand that many disagree with us, our decision regarding marriage is based on the belief that the words of the Apostle Paul to the Galatians are true for the church today: All who have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is no longer Jew or Gentile, slave or free, male or female, for all are one in Christ.”

“For so many who are committed to following Jesus in the way of love and being a church that lives that love, this decision will bring real pain,” he said. “For fellow disciples of Jesus in our church who are gay or lesbian, this will bring more pain. For many who have felt and been rejected by the church because of who they are, for many who have felt and been rejected by families and communities, our church opening itself in love was a sign of hope. And this will add pain on top of pain.”

Curry told the primates that he was in no sense comparing his own pain to theirs, but “I stand before you as your brother. I stand before you as a descendant of African slaves, stolen from their native land, enslaved in a bitter bondage, and then even after emancipation, segregated and excluded in church and society. And this conjures that up again, and brings pain.

“The pain for many will be real. But God is greater than anything. I love Jesus and I love the church. I am a Christian in the Anglican way. And like you, as we have said in this meeting, I am committed to ‘walking together’ with you as fellow primates in the Anglican family.”

Sing to the Lord!!

I have always love the Venite!




Venite

Psalm 95:1-7
Come let us sing to the Lord;*
let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving*
and raise a loud shout to him with psalms.
For the Lord is a great God,*
and a great King above all gods.
In his hand are the caverns of the earth,*
and the heights of the hills are his also.
The sea is his, for he made it,*
and his hands have molded the dry land.
Come, let us bow down, and bend the knee,*
and kneel before the Lord our Maker.
For he is our God, and we are the people of his pasture
and the sheep of his hand.*
Oh, that today you would hearken to his voice!

Monday, January 04, 2016

Finding God in the World - my essay posted at NAES Blog

My essay on "Finding God in the World" was posted at the National Association of Episcopal Schools "Commons" blog today:

Finding God in the World

The Rev. Peter M. Carey
January 04, 2016

My Episcopal priest when I was growing up always said that he loved getting books for Christmas, but that he wished that people could also grant him the time to read them as well. It is a blessing to serve as a school chaplain and have a bit of time to read in the days following Christmas.
Over the last few days, I have had the great pleasure to read the new book, Grounded: Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution, by my friend and former professor, Diana Butler Bass. Diana is a wonderful writer, and is grounded (pun intended) as a student of history, theology, and the church. InGrounded, she describes some of the ways that we can know God that may surprise us with their apparent “newness,” even though they are also rooted deeply to the theological tradition.She speaks of the ways that people are finding the nearness of God :
Far too many people who understand God in these ways probably do not know how rich the tradition is that speaks of God with us, God in the stars and sunrise, God as the face of their neighbor, God in the act of justice, or God as the wonder of love. The language of divine nearness is the very heart of vibrant faith. Yet it has often been obscured by vertical theologies and elevator institutions, which, I suspect, are far easier to both explain and control. Drawing God within the circle of the world is a messy and sometimes dangerous business.
As a school chaplain, I loved hearing her descriptions of the ways that more and more people are becoming aware of God not as a distant and nearly absent rule-maker or watchmaker. Rather, Diana describes the plethora of ways that we can know and experience God who is nearby us, among us, and grounded in the soil, water, air, and in the communities in which we dwell.
As I make my way around campus, I find that God is present, not only in chapel services or in the midst of time for prayer and meditation, but also in the everyday moments in a school’s life. Whether it is in the athletic training room where our caring trainers help our athletes to heal, or in the lower division lunchroom where parent volunteers help our littlest ones find sustenance. God is present in our vegetable garden that our middle division director tends along with her student gardening club. God is also present in the grand performances on stage and on athletic fields, and is also present in the moments of disappointment and defeat as team members care for one another.
In this new calendar year, I am not taking on any new resolutions. However, I am praying for the gift of awareness of the ways that God is present and loving in the midst of the everyday stuff of the world. My second prayer is to help others to see the ways that God is present in the midst of us, and give thanks for this everyday gift of seeing “God within the circle of the world.”

Finding God in the World: My essay at the NAES Commons

My essay on "Finding God in the World" was posted at the National Association of Episcopal Schools "Commons" blog today:

Finding God in the World

The Rev. Peter M. Carey
January 04, 2016

My Episcopal priest when I was growing up always said that he loved getting books for Christmas, but that he wished that people could also grant him the time to read them as well. It is a blessing to serve as a school chaplain and have a bit of time to read in the days following Christmas.
Over the last few days, I have had the great pleasure to read the new book, Grounded: Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution, by my friend and former professor, Diana Butler Bass. Diana is a wonderful writer, and is grounded (pun intended) as a student of history, theology, and the church. InGrounded, she describes some of the ways that we can know God that may surprise us with their apparent “newness,” even though they are also rooted deeply to the theological tradition.She speaks of the ways that people are finding the nearness of God :
Far too many people who understand God in these ways probably do not know how rich the tradition is that speaks of God with us, God in the stars and sunrise, God as the face of their neighbor, God in the act of justice, or God as the wonder of love. The language of divine nearness is the very heart of vibrant faith. Yet it has often been obscured by vertical theologies and elevator institutions, which, I suspect, are far easier to both explain and control. Drawing God within the circle of the world is a messy and sometimes dangerous business.
As a school chaplain, I loved hearing her descriptions of the ways that more and more people are becoming aware of God not as a distant and nearly absent rule-maker or watchmaker. Rather, Diana describes the plethora of ways that we can know and experience God who is nearby us, among us, and grounded in the soil, water, air, and in the communities in which we dwell.
As I make my way around campus, I find that God is present, not only in chapel services or in the midst of time for prayer and meditation, but also in the everyday moments in a school’s life. Whether it is in the athletic training room where our caring trainers help our athletes to heal, or in the lower division lunchroom where parent volunteers help our littlest ones find sustenance. God is present in our vegetable garden that our middle division director tends along with her student gardening club. God is also present in the grand performances on stage and on athletic fields, and is also present in the moments of disappointment and defeat as team members care for one another.
In this new calendar year, I am not taking on any new resolutions. However, I am praying for the gift of awareness of the ways that God is present and loving in the midst of the everyday stuff of the world. My second prayer is to help others to see the ways that God is present in the midst of us, and give thanks for this everyday gift of seeing “God within the circle of the world.”