Friday, August 31, 2018

St. Martin in the Fields, Chestnut Hill Parish Honors Nellie Greene

 

Natalee Hill for St. Martin’s | Philadelphia

A stained-glass window at the Church of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in Philadelphia honors the memory of the Rev. Elinor Robinson Greene II.

Deacon Greene, known as Nellie, was born and raised in Chestnut Hill. She was baptized at St. Martin’s and grew up there, participating in the church school and the choir. A car accident during her college years left her severely disabled. She died on Aug. 27, 2016.

Nellie Greene, right, with her mother, Cookie

The window depicts a smiling Deacon Greene in her vestments and seated in her wheelchair with her voice box on her lap. Below the circles containing her parents’ initials, the scroll reads, “Be responsible to each other, the earth, and all sentient beings.”

The window was dedicated on June 10. Placed above the Willow Grove entrance to the church, the window is at the same entrance as the ramp that St. Martin’s installed four years ago. “She also agitated us to build that ramp out there,” said the Rev. Jarrett Kerbel, rector. “Nellie was one of the first people up that ramp.”

Window design, rendering, production, and installation were by Willet Hauser Architectural Glass and was funded by gifts from the extended Greene family.

St. Martin’s also supported a short biography, The Rev. Elinor Robinson Greene II: Through the Narrow Door, that was presented to family members and friends. A PDF of the biography is available from St. Martin’s.

Regulations for St. Mary’s Episcopal Church - Cathedral Road Lawn Columbarium

Saint Mary’s Episcopal Church - Cathedral Road ☩ 


Regulations for St. Mary’s Episcopal Church - Cathedral Road Lawn Columbarium


  1. The Lawn Columbarium is to be used for cremated remains only.  The scattering of ashes is not permitted


  1. The location of internments within the Lawn Columbarium is in accordance with the plan of St. Mary’s - Cathedral Road which will follow an orderly sequence.


  1. The Sexton (or other staff-member) will prepare the site for burial and will be present for the internment to assist the family.  The cost for the Sexton is included below.


  1. Arrangements for an internment are made with the Parish Office at least three days in advance of internment.  All fees established by the Vestry of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Cathedral Road are to be paid at this time.


  1. All grave markers are to be in conformity with the plan as established by the Church.  The markers will consist to a gray granite marker 1’ by 1’ by 4” to be level with the ground and may include full name, year of birth and year of death only.  The marker and inscription is included in the opening fee.


  1. No decorations or plantings other than cut flowers are permitted in the Lawn Columbarium.  Cut flowers are permitted, and may be removed at the discretion of the Church staff. 


Rates:

$550 for Columbarium Plot $200 Organist fee 

$250 Opening fee (if needed)

$100 Sexton fee $200 Use of Parish Hall

$250 Clergy fee (non-members)


630 East Cathedral Road, Philadelphia, PA 19128 ☩ 

434.242.6633


 

St Mary's Episcopal Church 10th Annual Car Show - September 1st Rain Date - September 8th


St Mary's Episcopal Church
10th Annual Car Show - September 1st
Rain Date - September 8th
All vehicle years and classes welcome!  Over 50 Trophies!
Sign-in 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.   -   Show 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Pre-registration           $15
Day of Show                 $20

Accepting monetary and canned good donations.  A portion of the proceeds to benefit St. Mary's Church.  Cars must be driven onto show area.  For more information and to register, please click here: roxboroughridgerunners.com 
And....White Elephant & Concession Stand!
Come for the cars, stay for lunch and find a treasure!



Monday, August 27, 2018

We gather together








We gather together
We gather together
to ask the Lord's blessing;
He chastens and hastens
His will to make known;
The wicked oppressing
now cease from distressing;
Sing praises to His Name;
He forgets not His own.
Beside us to guide us,
our God with us joining,
Ordaining, maintaining
His kingdom divine;
So from the beginning
the fight we were winning;
Thou, Lord, were at our side,
all glory be Thine!
We all do extol Thee,
Thou Leader triumphant,
And pray that Thou still
our Defender will be;
Let Thy congregation
escape tribulation;
Thy Name be ever praised!
O Lord, make us free!
We gather together
to ask the Lord's blessing.

Sunday, August 26, 2018

God be with you, Wesley Parrott!









Bread




“Bread is the welcoming sight and aroma on a dining table that says, “sit down and stay a while”. It’s the first course, though never counted as such, designed to be broken, buttered, dipped, and shared to temporarily satiate even the heartiest of appetites before the meal arrives. It is the communal element, part earthy and part sacred.”
-Tracy C. Yancey

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Love your neighbor




When Jesus said to love your neighbor, a lawyer who was present asked him to clarify what he meant by neighbor. He wanted a legal definition he could refer to in case the question of loving one ever happened to come up. He presumably wanted something on the order of: "A neighbor (hereinafter referred to as the party of the first part) is to be construed as meaning a person of Jewish descent whose legal residence is within a radius of no more than three statute miles from one's own legal residence unless there is another person of Jewish descent (hereinafter to be referred to as the party of the second part) living closer to the party of the first part than one is oneself, in which case the party of the second part is to be construed as neighbor to the party of the first part and one is oneself relieved of all responsibility of any sort or kind whatsoever."
Instead, Jesus told the story of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37), the point of which seems to be that your neighbor is to be construed as meaning anybody who needs you. The lawyer's response is left unrecorded.

-Frederick Buechner, Originally published in Wishful Thinking and later in Beyond Words

Love your neighbor



When Jesus said to love your neighbor, a lawyer who was present asked him to clarify what he meant by neighbor. He wanted a legal definition he could refer to in case the question of loving one ever happened to come up. He presumably wanted something on the order of: "A neighbor (hereinafter referred to as the party of the first part) is to be construed as meaning a person of Jewish descent whose legal residence is within a radius of no more than three statute miles from one's own legal residence unless there is another person of Jewish descent (hereinafter to be referred to as the party of the second part) living closer to the party of the first part than one is oneself, in which case the party of the second part is to be construed as neighbor to the party of the first part and one is oneself relieved of all responsibility of any sort or kind whatsoever."
Instead, Jesus told the story of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37), the point of which seems to be that your neighbor is to be construed as meaning anybody who needs you. The lawyer's response is left unrecorded.

-Frederick Buechner, Originally published in Wishful Thinking and later in Beyond Words

Your ways are ways of righteousness and truth




Canticle 19 The Song of the Redeemed 
Revelation 15:3-4
Magna et mirabilia

O ruler of the universe, Lord God,
great deeds are they that you have done, *
surpassing human understanding.
Your ways are ways of righteousness and truth, *
O King of all the ages
Who can fail to do you homage, Lord
and sing the praises of your Name
for you only are the Holy One.
All nations will draw near and fall down before you
because your just and holy works have been revealed.
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Glorify the Lord




Canticle 12 A Song of Creation

Song of the Three Young Men, 35-65 
Benedicite, omnia opera Domini

Invocation
Glorify the Lord, all you works of the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
In the firmament of his power, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
I The Cosmic Order
Glorify the Lord, you angels and all powers of the Lord, *
O heavens and all waters above the heavens.
Sun and moon and stars of the sky, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, every shower of rain and fall of dew, *
all winds and fire and heat.
Winter and Summer, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O chill and cold, *
drops of dew and flakes of snow.
Frost and cold, ice and sleet, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O nights and days, *
O shining light and enfolding dark.
Storm clouds and thunderbolts, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
II The Earth and its Creatures
Let the earth glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O mountains and hills,
and all that grows upon the earth, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O springs of water, seas, and streams, *
O whales and all that move in the waters.
All birds of the air, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O beasts of the wild, *
and all you flocks and herds.
O men and women everywhere, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
III The People of God
Let the people of God glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O priests and servants of the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Glorify the Lord, O spirits and souls of the righteous, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
You that are holy and humble of heart, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
Doxology
Let us glorify the Lord: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.
In the firmament of his power, glorify the Lord, *
praise him and highly exalt him for ever.

Come let us sing to the Lord




Come let us sing to the Lord; * 
let us shout for joy to the Rock of our salvation.
Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving * 
and raise a loud shout to him with psalms.
For the Lord is a great God, * 
and a great King above all gods.
In his hand are the caverns of the earth, * 
and the heights of the hills are his also.
The sea is his, for he made it, * 
and his hands have molded the dry land.
Come, let us bow down, and bend the knee, * 
and kneel before the Lord our Maker.
For he is our God, 
and we are the people of his pasture and the sheep of his hand. * 
Oh, that today you would hearken to his voice! 
Glory be to the Father and to the Son,
And to the Holy Spirit.
As it was in the beginning, is now, 
And will be forever. Amen.

Friday, August 24, 2018


Morning prayers



Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from the Lord 
Jesus Christ.    Philippians 1:2


I was glad when they said to me, "Let us go to the house of 
the Lord."    Psalm 122:1


Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart 
be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my strength and my 
redeemer.    Psalm 19:14


Send out your light and your truth, that they may lead me, 
and bring me to your holy hill and to your dwelling. 

Psalm 43:3


The Lord is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence 
before him.    Habakkuk 2:20


The hour is coming, and now is, when the true worshipers 
will worship the Father in spirit and in truth, for such the 
Father seeks to worship him.    John 4:23


Thus says the high and lofty One who inhabits eternity, 
whose name is Holy, "I dwell in the high and holy place and 
also with the one who has a contrite and humble spirit, to
revive the spirit of the humble and to revive the heart of the 
contrite."    Isaiah 57:15

Atttention




“Attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.” 

― Simone Weil, philosopher

who died on this day in 1943

Thursday, August 23, 2018

The Blessing of the Backpacks at St. Mary's ~ 19 August 2018





Walter Brueggemann on The Eucharist




“The church is the only community in the world that has as its central symbolic act, an act that is called, “Thanks.” The Eucharist. You know Eucharist is Greek for “Thanks.” And participation in the Eucharist is an act of gratitude for the abundance that the creator God gives to the world.
And I think that the neighborly economy can only be funded by gratitude. It is all a gift! I did not make any of it, produce any of it, it is a gift! But the extraction economy wants to think, “It’s mine!” “I made it, I own it, I can do what I want, I don’t have to be grateful to anybody.”
Which leads me to think that participation in the Eucharist is the most subversive thing we can do.
But notice what the long history of the church has done to the Eucharist. It has siphoned off its danger into something about sin and salvation and getting right with God, rather than a meal for the neighborhood. The African Americans in the United Church of Christ calls the Eucharist “The Welcome Table.” All are welcome, no restrictions. All are welcome because there is more than enough.”
-Walter Brueggemann

Reflection on The Eucharist by Walter Brueggemann



“The church is the only community in the world that has as its central symbolic act, an act that is called, “Thanks.” The Eucharist. You know Eucharist is Greek for “Thanks.” And participation in the Eucharist is an act of gratitude for the abundance that the creator God gives to the world.
And I think that the neighborly economy can only be funded by gratitude. It is all a gift! I did not make any of it, produce any of it, it is a gift! But the extraction economy wants to think, “It’s mine!” “I made it, I own it, I can do what I want, I don’t have to be grateful to anybody.”
Which leads me to think that participation in the Eucharist is the most subversive thing we can do.
But notice what the long history of the church has done to the Eucharist. It has siphoned off its danger into something about sin and salvation and getting right with God, rather than a meal for the neighborhood. The African Americans in the United Church of Christ calls the Eucharist “The Welcome Table.” All are welcome, no restrictions. All are welcome because there is more than enough.”
-Walter Brueggemann

You can now pledge or give to St. Mary's using our online service Tithe.Ly

Check it out!

We have launched an online giving service named "Tithe.ly" to do a soft roll-out and a trial-run to see if we like it for online giving, online pledging, special gifts, flower donations, special requests and much more.  From an administrative side, we can also generate reports for givers at any point.  In addition, you can request a recurring gift (every week, every month, etc) and not have to worry about writing checks and dealing with the envelopes in church.

The Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania has fully vetted this service, and thousands of churches are using it.  I believe it is just great, but would love to hear what you think.

I put a button link, below, in green that says "Give."  All you need to do is click the button, set up an account and give any amount over $5 to give it a trial run.

As I said, it is fully vetted, secure, and a highly user-friendly service.

Check it out if you have a moment, and let me know what you think!

~Peter+

The Rev. Peter M. Carey, Rector
revpetermcarey@gmail.com


Wednesday, August 22, 2018

O Gracious Light


O Gracious Light    Phos hilaron

O gracious light,
pure brightness of the everliving Father in heaven,
O Jesus Christ, holy and blessed!

Now as we come to the setting of the sun,
and our eyes behold the vesper light,
we sing your praises, O God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

You are worthy at all times to be praised by happy voices,
O Son of God, O Giver of Life,
and to be glorified through all the worlds.